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2005-06 Events

2005-06 Events

SUMMER EVENTS

Monday, July 31, 2006

Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Deep Listening, Deep Hearing: Buddhism and Psychotherapy East & West”
Dr. Jan Chozen Bays, M.D., Abbot, Great Vow Zen Monastery
Gerlinger Lounge
7:00 pm

SPRING TERM EVENTS

Thursday, April 6, 2006

Korea Speaker Series – Brown Bag talk
“High-Tech Ventures in Korea”
Moonhyun Nam, Reporter, Seoul Economic Daily; Visiting Scholar, Center for Asian and Pacific Studies
103 Gerlinger Hall
12:00 pm

Friday, April 14, 2006

China Speaker Series – Engaging China: History, Culture, Politics
“Why Ancient China Just Never Goes Away”
Steve Durrant, Professor of Chinese Literature; Acting Associate Dean of Humanities, University of Oregon
Lillis Hall, Room 212
12:00 pm

This talk is cosponsored by the Lundquist College of Business.

Monday, April 17, 2006

Korea Speaker Series
“Our Nation: A Korean Punk Rock Community” Lecture and Documentary Showing
Dr. Stephen Epstein, Director, Asian Studies Institute, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
Lillis Hall, Room 111
4:00 pm

The rise of a new youth subculture in the Republic of Korea is an outgrowth of dramatic changes occurring there in the 1990’s. The country elected its first civilian president, it experienced new prosperity, and became increasingly exposed to Western influences. Young Koreans became exposed to the internet and a steady stream of new musical influences. Our Nation is a stunning portrayal of how Korean youth are using punk rock to find their voices in a rapidly changing culture.

This talk is cosponsored by the Oregon Humanities Center and the Asian Studies Program.

Friday, April 21, 2006

China Speaker Series – Engaging China: History, Culture, Politics
“Let the Best Win. Ritual, Performance, and Competition in Chinese History”
Ina Asim, Associate Professor of History, University of Oregon
Lillis Hall, Room 212
12:00 pm

This talk is cosponsored by the Lundquist College of Business.

Friday, April 28, 2006

Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Lovers, Talkers, Monsters, and Good Women: Contrasting Images from 16th-Century Chinese Epitaphs and Fiction.”
Katherine Carlitz, Assistant Director for Academic Affairs, Asian Studies Center; Adjunct Professor, Department of East Asian Languages & Literatures, University of Pittsburgh
Knight Library Browsing Room
3:30 pm

Monday, May 1, 2006

Jeremiah Lecture Series
“The City and the Citizen: Forms in Bombay and Bengal in the 50s Cinema”
Moinak Biswas, Department of Film Studies, Jadavpur University, Calcutta
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:00 pm

Moinak Biswas writes on Indian cinema and culture and has contributed to various journals and anthologies. He edits the Journal of the Moving Image, an annual publication of Jadavpur University, has edited two volumes of Bengali writings by Hemango Biswas, and the forthcoming (April, 2006) Apu and After: Revisiting Rays Cinema (Calcutta: Seagull Books and Oxford: Berg Publishers).

This event is presented by the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies and cosponsored by the CSWS Empire RIG, the Oregon Humanities Center, Asian Studies, Comparative Literature, English, Ethnic Studies, the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics, and the Center on Race, Ethnicity, and Sexuality Sttdies (CRESS).

Tuesday, May 2, 2006 – EVENT CANCELLED

Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Kamishibai: the Construction of Space and the National Imaginary in Modernizing Japan”
Sharalyn Orbaugh, Associate Professor of Asian Studies and Women’s Studies, University of British Columbia
Lillis Hall, Room 182
4:00 pm

Friday, May 5, 2006

China Speaker Series – Engaging China: History, Culture, Politics
“Transforming the Chinese Economy: The Making of a High Tech Competitor”
Richard P. Suttmeier, Professor of Political Science, University of Oregon
Lillis Hall, Room 212
12:00 pm

This talk is cosponsored by the Lundquist College of Business.

Friday, May 12, 2006

Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Performing (in) Bali: Kembali, Bali, and Hyper-Bali”
Michael Tenzer, Professor of Music, University of British Columbia
Knight Library Browsing Room
3:00 pm

Bali’s vibrant culture has experienced virtually nonstop accelerated change for a hundred years or more, almost always in conjunction with the phenomenon of cross-cultural interaction. This presentation combines film and discussion to problematize the multidimensional strategies, successes, and compromises that Balinese culture–seen here in terms of its music–has devised to cope with such change, which includes both inward-facing ultra-traditionalism and the upheavals of ongoing interface with others. These videos will be used a springboard for discussing cross-cultural interaction in the Balinese context and how it has changed over time.

Thursday, May 18, 2006

Korea Speaker Series – Brown Bag Talk
“Institutional Inertia: The Six Party Talks and the Future of Two Koreas”
Sangbum Shin, Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Oregon
159 PLC (Oregon Humanities Center Conference Room)
12:00 pm

Friday, May 19, 2006

China Speaker Series – Engaging China: History, Culture, Politics
“Networked Intelligence for the China Market”
Robert Felsing, East Asian Bibliographer, Knight Library, University of Oregon
Lillis Hall, Room 212
12:00 pm

This talk is cosponsored by the Lundquist College of Business.

Thursday, May 25, 2006

Jeremiah Public Lecture
“Candor the World Over: Toward Some Unlikely Connections Between Japanese film, Global Ideology, Health Care and Political Resistance”
Eric Cazdyn, Associate Professor of East Asian Studies, Comparative Literature and Cinema Studies, University of Toronto
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:30 pm

This talk explores a new candor emerging in the world today, one that immediately recognizes the objective logic of global capitalism–how the stunning inequalities in the world (especially around access to life-saving medications) are not the result of capitalism’s failures, but of its successes. One unlikely place where this growing candor is expressed is in contemporary Japanese cinema (in particular, in the work of Tsukamoto Shinya, Miike Takashi, and Kurosawa Kiyoshi). Clinical, imminent, non-referential, and non-moralizing: these directors twist their cold obsession with horror and the wounded body out of the bloody facts of contemporary history–while at the same time seeming to care nothing for the world. But when these insular cinematic obsessions are put near our most radical democratic desires (for global equality and justice), something sparks and fuses with some of the more hopeful political movements in the world today.

Friday,June 2, 2006

China Speaker Series – Engaging China: History, Culture, Politics
“U.S.-China Relations: Is a Rising China a Threat to the U.S.?”
Hua-yu Li, Associate Professor of Political Science, Oregon State University
Lillis Hall, Room 212
12:00 pm

This talk is cosponsored by the Lundquist College of Business.

WINTER TERM EVENTS

Monday,January 23, 2006

Jeremiah Public Lecture
“Comparative Study of Religion: Its Relevance to Study of Any One Tradition and to Philosophy of Religion”
Dale Cannon, Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, Western Oregon University
180 PLC
7:30 pm

Tuesday, January 24, 2006

Chinese New Year Celebration and Introduction of the
Chinese Flagship K-16 Academic Director, Madeline Spring
3:30 – 5:30 pm
EMU International Resource Center

Thursday, February 2, 2006

Jeremiah Public Lecture
“Meaning and Mantra: Indic Philosophy of Language in East Asia”
Richard Payne, Dean, Institute of Buddhist Studies, Graduate Theological Union
Gerlinger Lounge
7:30 pm

Monday, February 27, 2006

Phi Beta Kappa Public Lecture
“East and West in the Origins of a Modern World Economy”
Kenneth L. Pomeranz, Chancellor’s Professor of History, University of California, Irvine
180 Prince Lucien Campbell Hall
7:30 pm

Abstract:
Up until the eve of the Industrial Revolution, the more advanced economies in various parts of Eurasia were more similar than we had realized. This, in turn, demands new explanations for the enormous divergence in wealth and power that emerged in the nineteenth century and a new perspective on the old question of “Why was Europe first?”
Friday, March 10, 2006

“China: Its Borderlands and Its Neighbors”
Morris Rossabi, Professor of History, East Asian Institute at Columbia University and
The Graduate Center, City University of New York
Clark Honors College Library – Chapman Hall
3:00 pm

This talk is presented by the Clark Honors College and cosponsored by the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies and the Department of History. For more info, please call 346-3345.

Monday,March 20, 2006

Jeremiah Public Lecture
“Scythe and the City: Exploring Death in 20th Century Shanghai”
Christian Henriot, Fulbright Scholar, Center for Chinese Studies, University of California, Berkeley
375 McKenzie Hall
4:00 pm

FALL TERM EVENTS

Thursday, October 6, 2005

Jeremiah Public Lecture
“Chinese Family Survival Strategies in War and Revolution”
Sherman Cochran, Hu Shih Professor of History, Cornell University
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:00 pm

Friday,October 7, 2005

CAPS/Asian Studies Reception
375 McKenzie Hall
3:00 – 5:00 pm

Thursday, October 13, 2005

Jeremiah Public Lecture
“Pakhtuns and Political Challenges for Pakistan”
Dr. Ghulam Taqi Bangash, Dean, Faculty of Arts & Humanities; Professor, Department of History, University of Peshawar, Pakistan
Rogue River Room (in the EMU, near the food court)
4:00 pm

Pakhtuns have been in the news ever since the Pakhtun-dominated government of the Taliban was ousted by U.S. forces in October 2002. That same month, an Islamist coalition was voted into office in the Pakhtun-dominated Northwest Frontier Province (NWFP) that borders Afghanistan in Pakistan. Today, global politics still embroil local politics in the NWFP as Pakistani military forces hunt for terrorists in Pakhtun tribal areas along the border. Professor Bangash will address what the issues are for Pakhtuns in Afghanistan, the NWFP and nearby tribal areas in Pakistan, and the ensuing political challenges these issues create for the government of Pakistan.

Friday, October 21, 2005

Jeremiah Public Lecture
“The Political Landscape of War Memory in Japan”
Franziska Seraphim, Department of History, Boston College
375 McKenzie Hall
3:00 pm

Past Events, Listed by Academic Year

2013-2014
2012-2013
2011-12
2010-11

2009-10
2008-09
2007-08
2006-07
2005-06
2004-05
2003-04