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November 22, 2010

List of FLAS Fellows

Current Fellows

 

2017-18 Academic Year FLAS Fellows:

Graduate Fellows:

Nakota DiFonzo
Asian Studies, Chinese

Ken Ezaki
Asian Studies, Japanese

Sara King
East Asian Languages and Literatures, Korean

Joelle Thorne
East Asian Languages and Literatures, Japanese


Undergraduate Fellows:

Carynn Bratton
Cinema Studies, Korean

Jeremy Henninger-Chiang
East Asian Languages and Literatures/Asian Studies, Chinese

Alison Roden
East Asian Languages and Literatures/International Studies, Chinese

Ben Yuan Sheng Song
East Asian Languages and Literatures/Biology, Chinese


Previous FLAS Fellows

Summer 2017
Jason Lester, Comparative Literature, Chinese
Matthew Fouts, Law/International Studies, Japanese
Ellie Yeo, Linguistics, Chinese
Allene Shaw, Asian Studies, Japanese
Victoria Kwong, EALL/Economics, Chinese
Thomas Kelson, EALL/Romance Languages, Chinese
You Tao Ma, EALL/Chemistry, Chinese

2016-17 Academic Year

Dylan Brady, Geography, Chinese
Katherine Messer, Asian Studies, Chinese
Jason Lester, Comparative Literature, Chinese
Sean Brennan, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Chinese
Dana Benelli, EALL/Comparative Literature, Japanese
Katelyn Terra, EALL/Comparative Literature, Japanese
You Tao Ma, EALL/Chemistry, Chinese
Victoria Kwong, EALL/Economics, Chinese

Summer 2016
Elise Choi, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Japanese
Emily Cole, History, Japanese
Kun Xie, Art History, Japanese
Megan Pellouchoud, Asian Studies, Korean
Thomas Kelson, EALL/Romance Languages, Chinese
Alison Roden, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Chinese
Roxanne Fieldhouse, Biology, Japanese
Kasey Sullivan, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Chinese

2015-16 Academic Year
Brandon Folse, Asian Studies, Chinese
Emily Cole, History, Japanese
Robert Moore, Comparative Literature, Chinese
Breann Goosman, History, Japanese
Gwendolyn Snider, PPPM/REEES, Chinese
Kelsey Reed, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Chinese
Rachel Grant, EALL/Economics, Japanese
Kasey Sullivan, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Chinese

Summer 2015
Alison Parman, Art History, Japanese
Billy Goehring, Philosophy, Korean
Breann Goosmann, History, Japanese
Elise Choi, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Japanese
Ian Cipperly, History, Japanese
John Moore, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Japanese
Lee Moore, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Chinese
Allen Blanton, Chinese/Architecture, Chinese
Kasey Sullivan, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Chinese
Kylee Riala, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Japanese
Sarah Ramsey, Chinese/Business, Chinese
Shawna Sullivan, Chinese, Chinese
Ya Zhen Tan, Chinese/Psychology, Korean
Katelyn Terra, East Asian Languages and Literatures/Comparative Literature, Japanese
Alexander Fok, Japanese/Computer and Information Science, Japanese
Grace Jo, East Asian Languages and Literatures/Business, Chinese

2014-15 Academic Year
Hillary Maxson, History, Japanese
John D. Moore, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Japanese
Jessica Neafie, Political Science, Chinese
Michelle Crowson, Comparative Literature, Japanese
Benjamen DoVale, Political Science, Chinese
Ryan Michaels, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Japanese
Ayantu Megerssa, International Studies, Chinese

Summer 2014
Grace Jo, Business, Chinese
Alexis Mansour, Linguistics & East Asian Languages and Literature, Chinese
Gwendolyn Snider, Planning, Public Policy & Management, Chinese
Michelle Crowson, Comparative Literature, Japanese
Yu Chih Chou, East Asian Languages and Literature, Japanese
Sabra Harris, Folklore, Japanese
Jessica Neafie, Political Science, Chinese
Katriel Perry, Chinese, Chinese
Lindsey Larvick, undeclared, Chinese
Mani Woodward, Human Physiology, Chinese
Katherine Messer, Asian Studies, Chinese
Ana Rodriguez, Chinese/Spanish, Chinese

2013-14 Academic Year
Abram Emil Conant, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Chinese
Daniel Borengasser, History, Japanese
Michelle Crowson, Comparative Literature, Chinese
Rachel Wallner, Asian Studies, Chinese
Brian O’Donnell, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Chinese
Kathryn Lovett, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Japanese
Lauren Dalton, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Japanese

Summer 2013
Brian O’Donnell, EALL/REES, Chinese
Daniel Borengasser, History, Japanese
Elizabeth Grosz, Philosophy, Japanese
Erik Thorbeck, EALL/INTL, Chinese
Kathryn Lovett, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Korean
Michelle Crowson, Comparative Literature, Chinese
Samantha Gammons, International Studies

2012-13 Academic Year
Erik Glowark, History, Japanese
Ha Beom Kim, Anthropology, Chinese
Dylan Brady, Geography, Chinese
Rebekah Hunter, History, Japanese
Roxanne Olsson, International Studies, Chinese
Nichole Woodruff, Psychology, Korean
Brian O’Donnell, Russian/Chinese, Chinese
Brianna Eamons, Political Science/International Studies, Japanese
Lea Anderson, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Chinese
Hannelore Atteberry, Japanese, Japanese

Summer 2012
Julia Trippe, Linguistics
Faith Kreskey, Art History
Heather Cates, Art History
Robert pace, Chinese
Victoria Zhu, Mathematics and Chinese
May Schlotzhaur, Art History
Erika Watts, Japanese and International Studies
Brian O’Donnell, Chinese and Russian
Ji-Woo Suh, Journalism
Julia Sim, Undeclared

2011-12 Academic Year
Erik Glowark, History, Japanese
Kyle Fortenberry, History, Chinese
Jesse Rodenbiker, Asian Studies, Chinese
Pedro Bassoe, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Japanese
Sze Yan Li, Japanese/Product Design/Computer Information Science, Japanese
Margaret Simons, Chinese/Asian Studies, Chinese
Brandon Yeh, Political Science/Chinese, Chinese

Summer 2011
Rachel Wallner, Chinese, Asian Studies
Bryna Tuft, Chinese, East Asian Language and Literature
Kyle Nystrom, Japanese, Computer Science
Julie DePaulo, Japanese, Folklore
Matthew Hayes, Japanese, Asian Studies
Brian O’Donnell, Chinese, Classics
Lloyd Hall, Japanese, International Studies
Steven McVey, Korean, East Asian Language and Literature
Kelly Mucklestone, Chinese, Political Science/ Chinese
Timothy Arnold, Japanese, East Asian Language and Literature

2010-11 Academic Year
Hillary Maxson, Japanese, History
Katherine Thompson, Chinese, East Asia Languages and Literature
Julia Trippe, Korean, Linguistics
Kyle Shernuk, Japanese, East Asia Languages and Literatures
Gracie Beaver, Japanese, East Asian Languages and Literatures
Lauren Dickey, Chinese, Asian Studies
Lucy Gubbins, Japanese, Linguistics/Anthropology

Summer 2010
Genevieve Beecher, Chinese, International Studies
Charles Campbell, Chinese, Economics
Ashley Chan, Japanese, Literature
Allison Fonder, Chinese, Literature
Eric Gustafson, Japanese, Literature
Holina Ung, Chinese, International Studies
Nathan Fischler, Chinese, History
Emily Neyman, Chinese, Accounting
Dennis Tanner, Chinese, Literature
Stephen Glasgow, Japanese, History

2009-10 Academic Year
Bryna Tuft, Chinese, Literature
Grace Oh, Japanese, Linguistics
Kyle Shernuk, Chinese, Literature
Lisa Goetz, Chinese, Literature
Monica McClellan, Japanese, Literature
Patrick Terry, Japanese, Literature
Vanessa Mousavizadeh, Chinese, Planning, Public Policy, Management

Summer 2009
Katherine Thompson, Chinese, Literature
Kathryn Barton, Japanese, Literature
Keryn Price, Japanese, Literature
Stephen Henry, Japanese, Accounting

2008-09 Academic Year
Edwin Way, Chinese, Political Science
Grace Oh, Japanese, Linguistics
Patrick Terry, Japanese, Literature
Rory Walsh, Chinese, Anthropology
Sandra Koike, Japanese, Architecture
Tristan Grunow, Korean, History
Vanessa Mousavizadel, Chinese, Political Science

Summer 2008
Edwin Way, Chinese, Political Science
Jason Ross, Chinese, EALL
Kathryn Barton, Japanese, Literature
Paul Bournhonesque, Korean, Linguistics
Sandra Koike, Japanese, Architecture

2007-08 Academic Year
Cayce Pallister, Japanese, EALL
Chloe Garcia Roberts, Chinese, Literature
Christopher Hagen, Chinese, International Studies
Colleen Laird, Japanese, EALL
Edwin Way, Chinese, Political Science
Maureece Levin, Japanese, Anthropology

Summer 2007
Christopher Hagen, Chinese, International Studies
Grace Oh, Japanese, Linguistics
Gwendolyn Lowes, Chinese, Linguistics
Jon Jablonski, Chinese, Geography
Sandra Koike, Japanese, Architecture

2006-07 Academic Year
Austin Parks, Japanese, History
Colleen Laird, Japanese, EALL
Gwendolyn Lowes, Chinese, Linguistics
Kathryn Russell, Chinese, Art History
Luke Yamaguchi, Japanese, EALL
Tirstan Grunow, History, Japanese


November 9, 2010

NRC Faculty

East Asia Faculty Affiliates
The UO has a well-deserved reputation as a center of excellence for scholarship and teaching; and East Asian studies is the strongest area studies concentration on campus by almost every measure—faculty numbers, student enrollments, majors. The East Asian studies faculty publishes extensively.  The several books they have produced in recent years have been released by major university presses such as University of California, Stanford, Cambridge, University of Hawaii, and the University of Washington. Our faculty have also produced a number of edited volumes, and have contributed papers to many others. They regularly contribute articles to major journals, including the Journal of Asian Studies, China Quarterly, China Review, Asian Perspectives, and the Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies. Several have published Chinese, Japanese, and other translations of their monographs.

Over the past 5 years, EA faculty members have received numerous external grants, fellowships, awards, and distinctions from SSRC, ACLS, Chiang Ching-kuo, Fulbright, Japan Foundation, NEH, NSF, and the Stanford Humanities Center, among others.

Anthropology
Gyoung-Ah  Lee, Associate Professor — China, Korea

Architecture
Kyuho Ahn, Assistant Professor — Korea
Nancy Cheng, Associate Professor – East Asia
Howard  Davis, Professor — South Asia, East Asia
Kevin Nute, Professor — Japan

Art
Ying Tan, Associate Professor — China

Arts and Administration
Doug Blandy, Associate Dean of Academic Affairs (AAA); AAD Program Director — China
John Fenn, Assistant Professor in the Arts and Administration Program (AAD)

Art History
Charles  Lachman, Associate Professor — China, Korea
Jenny Lin, Assistant Professor — China
Akiko Walley, Maude I. Kerns Assistant Professor — Japan

Business
Lynn Kahle, Giustina Professor of Marketing — East Asia

Center for Applied Second Language Studies
Julie Sykes, Director

Comparative Literatures
Steven Brown, Professor — Japan

East Asian Languages and Literatures
Lucien Brown, Assistant Professor — Korea
Weijun Chen, Instructor — China
Roy Chan, Assistant Professor — China
Steve  Durrant, Professor — China
Maram  Epstein, Associate Professor — China
Alisa  Freedman, Associate Professor — Japan
Yukari Furikado, Instructor- Japan
Denise  Gigliotti, Instructor — China
Alison  Groppe, Associate Professor — China, Malaysia
Reiko Hashimoto, Senior Instructor — Japan
Kaori Idemaru, Associate Professor — Japan
Rika  Ikei, Instructor — Japan
Zhuo Jing-Schmidt, Associate Professor — China
Sae Kawase, Instructor — Japan
Dong Hoon Kim, Assistant Professor — Korea
Wendy  Larson, Professor — China
Eunyoung Lee, Instructor — Korea
Fengjun Mao, Instructor — China
Daisuke  Miyao, Associate Professor — Japan
Naoko  Nakadate, Senior Instructor — Japan
Yoko O’Brien, Instructor — Japan
Bomi Oh, Instructor — Korean
Glynne Walley, Assistant Professor — Japan
Yugen Wang, Associate Professor — China
Jason Webb, Assistant Professor – Japan
Jean  Wu, Senior Instructor — China

English
David Li, Professor — China

Geography
Daniel Buck, Associate Professor — China
Xiaobo  Su, Associate Professor — China

History
Ina  Asim, Associate Professor — China
Bryna  Goodman, Professor — China
Andrew Goble, Professor — Japan
Jeffrey  Hanes, Associate Professor — Japan

Honors College
Susanna  Lim, Associate Professor — Korea
Roxann  Prazniak, Associate Professor — China

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art
Anne Rose Kitagawa, Curator — East Asia

Journalism
Kyu  Youm, Professor — Korea

Knight Library
Noelle Byun, Korea Cataloguer
Kevin McDowell, Japan Studies Librarian
Xiaotong Wang, China Studies Librarian

Landscape Architecture 
Ron Lovinger, Professor- Japan

Law
Eric Priest, Assistant Professor — China

Linguistics
Scott  Delancey, Professor — China, Tibet

Music
Loren Kajikawa, Assistant Professor — Japan

Political Science
Karrie Koesel, Assistant Professor — China
Tuong Vu, Associate Professor — SE Asia

Planning, Public Policiy, and Management
Yizhao Yang, Associate Professor — East Asia

Religious Studies
Mark Unno, Associate Professor — Japan

Sociology
Eileen Otis, Associate Professor — China

Theater Arts
Alexandra  Bonds, Professor — China

November 3, 2010

CAPS Small Professional Grants for Graduate Students

The Center for Asian and Pacific Studies is offering awards of up to $500 in support of the professional activities of UO graduate students studying Asia. Awards will be made for the following purposes: travel to conferences to present papers, travel to library, museum, and archival collections; and expenses related to book and article production and publication. Your application should state that you have first tried to secure funds from your department.

To submit a proposal, please click here to complete the online application form.  A brief letter of support from your advisor explaining how this activity is central to your research interests is also required.  This letter can be emailed directly to Holly Lakey at lakey@uoregon.edu.

Applications will be reviewed twice per year. The deadlines for small grant applications are:

Fall: November 16, 2018 (for winter and spring 2019 projects)

Spring: April 5, 2019 (for summer and fall 2019 projects)

Awards must be used within one year of the date of the award. Applicants may apply for a CAPS Small Grant before they’ve been accepted to a conference, though their award will be continent upon acceptance confirmation.  No retroactive awards can be made.

Successful applicants are asked, after the award has been used, to write a brief letter to CAPS reporting on the completion of the relevant project.

For a hardcopy version of the application form, please contact Holly Lakey at lakey@uoregon.edu.

November 2, 2010

Nara, City of East Asia

International Symposium

Nara, City of East Asia
Cosmopolitanism and Localism in Eighth-Century Japan

Symposium Program

Friday, April 30 – Pape Reception Hall, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

9:00-11:30 am: Panel 1 – Urbanisms

Michael Como, Columbia University, “Urbanization and Purification in Ancient Japan”

Ellen van Goethem, Hosei University, “Where is the Tiger?: Capital Site Selection in Classical Japan”

Inoue Kazuto, Independent Administration Institution, National Institutes for Cultural Heritage, Nara National Research Institute for Cultural Properties, “The Path to Heijo: International Relations in 7th- and 8th-Century East Asia and the Construction of a Capital” (in Japanese)

Discussant: Jeffrey Hanes, University of Oregon

1:00-3:30 pm: Panel 2 – Figurations

Akiko Walley, University of Oregon, “Lost or Just Misplaced?: Possibilities for Reconstructing the Original Location of the Horyuji Five-story Pagoda Clay Figurines”

Yui Suzuki, University of Maryland, “The Resplendent Hall of Healing: Shomu and Komyo’s Shin Yakushiji”

Cynthea Bogel, University of Washington, “The Long Eighth Century: When Eighth-Century Chinese Icons Become Ninth-Century Japanese Icons”

Discussant: Junghee Lee, Portland State University

3:45-4:30 pm: Conclusions for Day 1/Open Discussion

Discussant: William Wayne Farris, University of Hawai’i at Manoa

5:00-6:30 pm: Public Lecture

“Why So Blue?: Mandala Transmission and the Transformation of Eighth-Century Representational Modes”
Cynthea Bogel, University of Washington

Discussant: Mark Unno, University of Oregon

6:30-7:30 pm: Public Reception – Lobby, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

Greetings from Consul-General of Japan in Portland, Okabe Takamichi, and UO President Richard Lariviere

Saturday, May 1 – Pape Reception Hall, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

9:00-11:30 am: Panel 3 – Regionalisms

Mori Kimiyuki, Toyo University, “Diplomatic Missions to Tang and the Introduction of Tang Culture” (in Japanese)

Tanaka Fumio, Kanto Gakuin University, “Center and Periphery in the International Affairs of Ancient Japan: The Ritsuryo State’s Cosmopolitanism, Marginality, and Plurality” (in Japanese)

Joan Piggott, University of Southern California, “Tracing the Wa-Kan Dialectic at Nara”

Discussant: Andrew Goble, University of Oregon

12:30-3:00 pm: Panel 4 – Articulations

Wesley Jacobsen, Harvard University, “What the Nara Period Documents Tell Us about the Prehistory and History of Japanese: The View from the Linguistic Sciences”

Jason Webb, University of Oregon, “Odes to an Exile: Heijo Remembrances of Miwa no Takechimaro”

Mack Horton, University of California, Berkeley, “Princess Nukata and the Birth of Man’yo Poetry”

Discussant: Glynne Walley, University of Oregon

3:15-4:00 pm: Concluding Remarks/Open Discussion

Discussants: Akiko Walley and Jason Webb

This event is free and open to the public; no registration is required.

For more info, please call (541) 346-1521.

This event is cosponsored by the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies, the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, the Oregon Humanities Center, and the Departments of Art History and East Asian Languages and Literatures.   It is also made possible by generous contributions from the Maude I. Kerns Endowment and the Yoko McClain Fund, and a grant from the Japan-United States Friendship Commission and the Northeast Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies.

Conference Organizers: Akiko Walley and Jason Webb

Image credit:
Ichiyûsai (Utagawa) Kuniyoshi (1797-1861)
Japanese

Hyakunin isshu no uchi: Abe no Nakamaro (From the Collection of Single Poems by a Hundred Poets: Abe no Nakamaro) [detail], c. 1844-1854
Woodblock print
15 x 10-1/8 inches
Murray Warner Collection of Oriental Art
Collection of the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, University of Oregon
MWJ51:K79

International Conference on Nuclear Weapons and the Security of Korea and East Asia

International Conference on Nuclear Weapons
and the Security of Korea and East Asia

May 14, 2010 (UO) ~ May 17, 2010 (PSU)

Part of the Project on Historical Reconciliation and Cooperative Security in East Asia

Conference Program

Friday, May 14, 2010 – Knight Library Browsing Room

9:00 – 9:15 am
Opening Remarks

Dr. Mel Gurtov Visiting Professor of Political Science, University of Oregon, and Director, Institute for Asian Studies, Portland State University

9:15 – 10:30 am
Panel 1 – Korea’s Security: The Six Party Talks and After

Chair: Richard P. Suttmeier
Panelists: Peter Van Ness, Shin Beom Shik, Mel Gurtov

10:45 am – 12:00 pm
Panel 2 – The Nuclear Issue: Implications for Korea and Asia

Chair: Bruce Gilley
Panelists: Cai Jian, Mumin Chen, Byong-Moo Hwang,

1:00 – 2:45 pm
Panel 3 – Alternative Approaches to Security on the Korean Peninsula

Chair: Mark Valencia
Panelists: David Austin, Peter Beck, Karin Lee, Stu Thorson, Sung-Chul Yang

3:00 – 4:45 pm
Panel 4 – Nuclear Weapons and Global Security

Chair: Ron Tammen
Panelists: Patrick Morgan, Peter Van Ness, Mark Valencia, Richard P. Suttmeier

5:30 pm
Keynote Lecture

“Looking Backward to Go Forward: On Future Korea-U.S. Relations”
Dr. Yang Sung-chul, Chairman, the Kim Dae-jung Peace Foundation Advisory Committee and a Distinguished Professor, Korea University; former Korea Ambassador to the United States, 2000-2003

This event is free and open to the public; no registration is required.

For more info, please call (541) 346-1521.

This event is cosponsored by UO’s Center for Asian and Pacific Studies and PSU’s Institute for Asian Studies. Funding has generously been provided by The UO-Hanyang Gift, the UO College of Arts and Sciences, the Jeremiah Lecture Series Fund, PSU’s Office of International Affairs, The Asian Perspective Journal and the PSU Confucius Institute.

2004-05 Events

2004-05 Events

FALL TERM EVENTS

Wednesday, September 15, 2004
Faculty Colloquium
“Between Cultures: Buddhism and Psychotherapy in the 21st Century”
A talk by Professors Nabeshima and Naito
Ryukoku University, Kyoto, Japan
159 PLC
1:00 pm


Friday, October 8, 2004

CAPS/Asian Studies Annual Reception
McKenzie Hall, Room 375
3:00 – 5:00 pm


Monday, October 18, 2004

Poetry Reading by Bei Dao
Knight Library Browsing Room
7:00 pm


Tuesday, October 19, 2004

Lecture: “Underground Literature in Late 60’s China”
Bei Dao
Lillis Hall, Room 112
4:00 pm


Wednesday, October 20, 2004

Public Lecture
“What is the Point of an Economy? Citizenship and Consumption in Postwar Japan”
Laura Hein, Department of History, Northwestern University
McKenzie Hall, Room 375
4:00 pm

Friday, October 22 – Saturday, October 23, 2004
Conference: “Private Life in Late Imperial China: Objects, Images, and Texts”
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art
Lecture Hall
9:00 am – 4:00 pm

WINTER TERM EVENTS

Thursday, January 6, 2005
Jeremiah Public Lecture
“Inside-Out: A Decade of China Reporting For Overseas Readers”
Peter Wonacott, China Correspondent in Shanghai for The Wall Street Journal
Knight Library Browsing Room
7:00 pm


Tuesday, January 25, 2005

Jeremiah Public Lecture
“Shanxi as Translocal Imaginary: Reforming the Local”
David Goodman, Professor of Political Science and Pro Vice Chancellor at the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
McKenzie Hall, Room 375
4:00 pm


Monday, February 21, 2005

Jeremiah Public Lecture
“Early Taoist Meditation”
Harold Roth, Professor of Chinese Religions, Brown University
Lillis Hall, Room 182
7:30 pm


Wednesday, February 23, 2005

Jeremiah Public Lecture
“History, Identity and Security: Commemorating National Humiliation Day in China”
William A Callahan, Senior Lecturer in International Politics; Director, Centre for Contemporary China Studies, University of Durham, England
Clark Honors College Library (Chapman Hall, Room 301)
4:00 pm

SPRING TERM EVENTS

Thursday, April 7, 2005
Jeremiah Public Lecture
“Getting to Rapprochement over Kashmir: Blending Realism with Justice”
Rifaat Hussain, Chairman of the Department of Defense and Strategic Studies, Quaid-I-Azam University – Islamabad
Knight Law Center, Room 184
4:00 pm

Thursday, April 14, 2005
CODAC lecture
“Mamiya Rinzo and the Japanese Mapping of Sakhalin Island”
Dr. Brett L. Walker, Associate Professor of History, Montana State University, Bozeman
Knight Library Browsing Room
3:30 pm


Friday, April 22, 2005

Brown Bag talk
“Korean Literature: Oral Epics”
Kyeung-Sin Park, Department of Korean Literature, University of Ulsan, Korea
CAPS Seminar Room (103 Gerlinger)
12:00 pm


Tuesday, April 26, 2005
Diagonal: A performance of music and poetry in English, German, and Japanese by Aki Takase and Yoko Tawada
Gerlinger Lounge
7:30 pm

Monday, May 2, 2005
“A View of the U.S. from Across the Pacific”
Takeshi Kawasaki, Journalist, Foreign News Department at the Asahi Shimbun in Tokyo
Gerlinger Lounge
2:00 pm

Thursday, May 5, 2005
Jeremiah Public Lecture
“Falling Between the Cracks: North Korean Women’s Human Rights”
Mikyoung Kim, Public Affairs Section, U.S. Embassy, Seoul, Korea; Visiting Fulbright Scholar, Portland State University
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:00 pm

Monday, May 9, 2005
Jeremiah Public Lecture
Muslims or Heretics?

A film screening and talk about struggles between moderate and radical Islamist forces in Bangladesh.
Naeem Mohaiemen, Editor, Shobak.Org; Director, DisappearedInAmerica.org project and Muslims Or Heretics
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:00 pm

Thursday, May 12, 2005
PPPM Lecture Series
“Strategies for Female Empowerment Used by the Feminist Movement in Pakistan: A Critical Analysis
Huma Haq, Visiting Pakistani Scholar
Hendricks Hall Hearth
3:00 pm

Friday, May 13, 2005
Jeremiah Public Lecture
“Japanese Security Policy: The Times They are a Changing?”
Richard Samuels, Ford International Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for International Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
McKenzie Hall, Room 125
3:00 pm

 

Friday, May 20, 2005
Brown Bag talk
“Structural Change of Consumption in Korea”
Inheun Choi, visiting economist
103 Gerlinger Hall
12:00 pm

Thursday, May 26, 2005
Jeremiah Public Lecture
“Shifting Power: From State-centric to Negotiated Governance in South Korea”
Hyuk-Rae Kim, Professor of Korean Studies, Graduate School of International Studies, Yonsei University, Korea
Knight Library Browsing Room
3:00 pm

 

Past Events, Listed by Academic Year

2013-2014
2012-2013
2011-12
2010-11

2009-10
2008-09
2007-08
2006-07
2005-06
2004-05
2003-04

2003-04 Events

2003-04 Events

FALL TERM EVENTS
Wednesday, October 8, 2003
CAPS/Asian Studies Annual Welcome Reception
McKenzie Hall, Room 375
3:30 – 5:00 pm
Friday, October 10, 2003
Brown Bag Talk
“Disease and the Dilemmas of Identity: Representations of Women in Modern Chinese Literature”
Eileen Vickery, East Asian Languages and Literatures
12:00 pm
CAPS Seminar Room (Gerlinger Hall, Room 103)

Wednesday, October 15, 2003
Freeman Public Lecture
“Culture(s) in Eastern Asia: Views from Asia”
Wang Gungwu, National University of Singapore
Knight Library Browsing Room
3:00 pm

Wednesday, October 15, 2003
Film Showing
The Life and Times of Wu Zhong Xian
A discussion with the filmmaker Evans Chan to follow
Willamette Hall, Room 110
7:00 pm

Thursday, October 16 – Saturday, October 18, 2003
Freeman Conference

“From the Book to the Internet: Communication Technologies, Human Motions,
and Cultural Formations in Eastern Asia”
October 16-18, 2003
Gerlinger Lounge

Thursday, October 23, 2003
Seminar: “Disappearing Worlds: Anthropology and Cultural Studies in Hawaii and the Pacific,” appearing in the 2001 collection “Native Pacific Cultural Studies on the Edge,” edited by Kehaulani Kauanui and Vince Diaz, The Contemporary Pacific 13(2):381-416.
Geoff White, Department of Anthropology, University of Hawaii
PLC, Room 159
12:00 pm

Thursday, October 23, 2003
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Fracturing the Postcolonial: A Pacific Genealogy”
Geoff White, Department of Anthropology, University of Hawaii
Willamette Hall, Room 110
7:00 pm

Thursday, October 30, 2003
Film Showings:
Feeding Boys, Ayaya
(Beijing, 2003) 80 minutes
The Old Testament (Beijing, 2001) 74 minutes
207 Chapman Hall.
6:00 -9:00 pm

Friday, October 31, 2003
Film Showings:
Enter the Clowns (Beijing, 2002) 79 minutes
Keep Cool and Don’t Blush (Beijing, 2003) 70 minutes
115 Pacific Hall
5:00 – 8:00 pm

Monday, November 3, 2003
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Legislating Justice: The Evolution of Feminist and Human Rights Jurisprudence in the Postcolonial Sub-Continent”
Dr. Faustina Pereira, Advocate, Supreme Court of Bangladesh; Member and Deputy Director, Ain-o-Salish Kendro (ASK), Dhaka, Bangladesh
Knight Library Browsing Room
3:30 pm

Thursday, November 13, 2003
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“‘Freedom=Death’: Conjurings, Oaths and Secrecy in the Filipino Revolution of 1896”
Vincent Rafael, Department of History, University of Washington
Knight Library Browsing Room
7:00 pm

Friday, November 14, 2003
Seminar: “The Cell Phone and the Crowd: Messianic Politics in the Contemporary Philippines” (Public Culture vol. 15, no. 3, October 2003).
Vincent Rafael, Department of History, University of Washington
McKenzie Hall, Room 375

12:00 PM

Wednesday, November 19, 2003
Brown Bag Talk
“Japanese War Photographers: Image, Identity, and Context of the Vietnam War in East Asia”
Ken Nakajo, University of Oregon Alumnus
12:00 pm
CAPS Seminar Room (Gerlinger Hall, Room 103)

Wednesday, December 3, 2003
Brown Bag Talk
“Histological Transformation and Age Estimation in Prehistoric South Asia”
Gwen Robbins, Department of Anthropology
12:00 pm
CAPS Seminar Room (Gerlinger Hall, Room 103)

Thursday, December 4, 2003
“Early Chinese Oral and Chirogaphic Cultures: The Han Descendants of Mr. Continuous Chanting and Mr. Repeated Inking”
Ken Brashier, Religious Studies, Reed College
10:00 am
CAPS Seminar Room (Gerlinger Hall, Room 103)

WINTER TERM EVENTS

Friday, January 30, 2004
Brown Bag Talk
“Screening Humor in Ozu Yasujiro’s wartime cinema, ‘The Brothers and
Sisters of the Toda Family'”
Junji Yoshida, Ph.D. Candidate, East Asian Languages and Literature
Gerlinger 103
12:00 pm

Wednesday, February 4, 2004
Freeman Public Lecture
“Japanese Knowledge of America Before Perry”
Yumiko Kawamoto, Waseda University and
Frederick Schodt, Independent Translator and Interpreter
180 PLC
12:00 pm

Wednesday, February 11, 2004
Brown Bag Talk
“Modern Girl and the New Life Movement: Body Politics and National Salvation”
Hsiao-pei Yen, Department of History, University of Oregon
CAPS Seminar Room (103 Gerlinger)
12:00 pm

Tuesday, February 17, 2004
“Globalization and the Minority Question in India”
Anjan Ghosh, Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta, India
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:00 pm

Friday, February 20 – Saturday, February 21, 2004
Symposium – Japanese-American Internment and Its Contemporary Implications
Participants: Frank Chin, Frank Emi, James Hirabayashi, Lawson Inada, Peggy Nagae, Sonny San Juan, Jr., Delia Aguilar, Moustafa Bayoumi, and Michi Okuda.
This event is presented by the Center for Critical Theory and Transnational Studies and cosponsored by the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies, the Department of History, the Ethnic Studies Program and the College of Arts and Sciences.

Thursday, February 26, 2004
Brown Bag Talk
“Speculative Fiction and the Spectacle of Race: Negotiations of Race, Space, and National Identity in 20th Century Asian America”
Serenity Hee Jung Joo (Comparative Literature)
CAPS Conference Room – Gerlinger 103
12:00 pm

Thursday, February 26, 2004
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“East Asia and Northeast Asia in Contemporary South Korean Discourse”
Paik Nak-chung, Editor, the quarterly Creation and Criticism (Changbi Publishers, Seoul); Professor Emeritus of English Literature, Seoul National University
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:00 pm
Reception to follow

SPRING TERM EVENTS

Thursday, April 1, 2004
Jeremiah Lecture Series – Postcolonial Inscriptions
“Eugenic Sexuality and Colonial Modernity”
Tani Barlow, Women’s Studies, University of Washington
Knight Library Browsing Room
7:00 pm

Thursday, April 15, 2004
South Asia Speaker Series
“My Body is in Pain”: Violence, the State, and Women in the Bangladesh Liberation War of 1971″
Yasmin Saikia, Department of History, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:00 pm

Monday, April 19, 2004
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Ethnicity, Violence and the State in Pakistan”
S. Zulfiqar Gilani, Rector (President), the Foundation University, Islamabad; Former Vice Chancellor, University of Peshawar, Pakistan
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:00 pm

Friday, April 30, 2004
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Institutional Templates of East Asian Capitalism: China, Korea and Japan”
Hong Yung Lee, Department of Political Science, University of California-Berkeley
McKenzie Hall, Room 375
3:30 pm

Wednesday, May 5, 2004
South Asia Speaker Series
“Maps, Borders and Identities: Cartographic Anxiety and Conflict in South Asia.”
Willem Van Schendel, Professor of Modern Asian History, University of Amsterdam
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:00 pm

Thursday, May 6, 2004
Freeman Lecture Series
“Hong Kong Bilingual Child Language Acquisition: Insights from the Dative”
Virginia Yip, Department of Modern Languages and Intercultural Studies, Chinese University of Hong Kong and Stephen Matthews, Department of Linguistics, University of Hong Kong
EMU River Rooms – Metolius
3:30 pm

Monday, May 10, 2004
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Dancing with My Mistress: Embezzlement and the Professionalization of Banking Employees in Republican-era Shanghai”
Pui Tak Lee, Centre of Asian Studies, University of Hong Kong
159 PLC
4:30 pm

Tuesday, May 11, 2004
Jeremiah Lecture Series – Premodern Japanese Buddhism: An Interdisciplinary Tapestry
“In the Name of the Buddha: Armed Monks and Protesters in Heian and Kamakura
Japan”
Mikael Adolphson, Department of History, Harvard University
Knight Library Browsing Room
7:00 pm

Wednesday, May 12, 2004
Freeman Lecture Series
“A Sea of Flowers: Matter, Sense and Affect in the Botanical Exploration of Southwest China
Eric Mueggler, Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan
375 McKenzie Hall
4:00 pm

Tuesday, May 25, 2004
Jeremiah Lecture Series – Premodern Japanese Buddhism: An Interdisciplinary Tapestry
“Chinese Threads in the Tapestry of Medieval Japanese Zen Buddhism”
Martin Collcutt, Department of History and East Asian Studies, Princeton University
Knight Library Browsing Room
7:00 pm

Thursday, May 27, 2004
Freeman Lecture Series
“Together-in-Difference: Beyond Diaspora, Into Hybridity”
Ien Ang, Professor of Cultural Studies and Director of the Centre for Cultural Research, University of Western Sydney, Australia
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:00 pm

Friday, May 28, 2004
“The Predicament of Diversity: Presenting ‘Asian Art’ in the Art Museum”
Ien Ang, Professor of Cultural Studies and Director of the Centre for Cultural Research, University of Western Sydney, Australia
Gerlinger Lounge
7:00 pm

ASPAC 2004 (Asian Studies on the Pacific Coast Annual Meeting)
June 18-20, 2004
University of Oregon
For more info, please visit the ASPAC website.

 

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2007-08 Events

SPRING TERM EVENTS

Friday, April 4, 2008


“Doing Business in China: Pinpointing the Top Emerging Markets”
Ted Plafker, Beijing Bureau Correspondent for The Economist and author of Doing Business in China: How to Profit in the World’s Fastest Growing Market
Lillis Hall, Room 211
2:00 pm

Thursday, April 10, 2008


“Reflecting on the Two-way Educational Exchange between Korea and the United States”
Jae-won Lee, Professor and Director, Journalism and Promotional Communication Division; Director of Curricular Affairs, Office of Academic Affairs, Cleveland State University
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:00 pm

Thursday, April 24, 2008


“The Revolution is Dead. Long Lives the Revolution: Rethinking Modern Chinese History”
Joseph Esherick, Hwei-chih and Julia Hsiu Professor of Chinese Studies, University of California, San Diego
McKenzie Hall, Room 221
4:00 pm

Wednesday, April 30, 2008


“From the Heart of a Tradition”
Lecture-Demonstration on South Indian Music and Dance
Aniruddha Knight & Ensemble
EMU Fir Room
2:00 pm
This event is cosponsored by the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies, the School of Music, and the Oregon Humanities Center. It is funded in part by the National Dance Project of the New England Foundation for the Arts, with lead funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. Additional funding was provided by The Ford Foundation, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the JP Morgan Chase Foundation, and the MetLife Foundation. Support for the preparation and presentation of this tour was also provided by the Asian Cultural Council, the Samuel H. Scripps Foundation, and the LEF Foundation. For more info, please call 346-1521.

Thursday, June 5, 2008


“Ozu, Directionality, and Quandaries in Cross-cultural Aesthetics”
Ben Singer, Associate Professor of Film, University of Wisconsin – Madison
Lillis Hall, Room 111
4:00 pm

 

Wednesday, May 28, 2008


“Notes from a Gambling Nation: Why China Is Not Going to Be the World’s Next Superpower”
John Pomfret, Editor, Outlook section, The Washington Post and Author of Chinese Lessons: Five Classmates and the Story of the New China
Lillis Hall, Room 282
5:00 pm
This event is presented by the Lundquist College of Business and is cosponsored by the School of Journalism and Communication, the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies, the Oregon Humanities Center, the Chinese Flagship Program, the Asian Studies Program, and the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures. For more information, please call (541) 346-1521.

 

WINTER TERM EVENTS

New Japanese Cinema Series
January 10 – March 13, 2008
Sponsored by EALL
A film will be shown each Thursday in Lillis Hall, Room 282, at 7:00 pm. 
JSMA – Buddhist Visions Exhibit EventsFriday, January 18, 2008
Preview Reception: Buddhist Visions
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art
5:30-8:00 pm
Wednesday, January 23, 2008
Lecture: “How Chan/Zen Paintings Mean: Two Portraits of Bodhidharma”
Charles Lachman, Curator of Asian Art, JSMA
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art
6:00 pm

Wednesday, January 30, 2008
Lecture: “Unframing Experience”
Jacquelynn Baas, author of Smile of the Buddha: Eastern Philosophy and Western Art from Monet to Today
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art
6:00 pm

Wednesday, February 13, 2008
Lecture and Demonstration: “In Search of the Meaning of Circles: Calligraphy in Zen Buddhism”
Kaz Tanahashi, Zen Buddhism scholar and calligrapher
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art
6:00 pm


Korea in Prehistory: An Archaeological Perspective
Engaging Korea Speaker Series
Dr. Seonbok Yi, Professor of Archaeology and Art History, Seoul National University
Wednesday, February 13, 2008
“Introducing Korean Archaeology and the Paleolithic Period (~10,000 BP)”
4:00 pm
Knight Library, Browsing Room
Thursday, February 14, 2008
“Neolithic and Earlier Bronze Periods (8000 – 2700 BP)”
12:00 pm
Lillis Hall, Room 111

Thursday, February 14, 2008
“Later Bronze and Early Iron Periods (2700 – 2000 BP)”
4:00 pm
Lillis Hall, Room 111

Friday, February 15, 2008
“New Data on the Acheulian-Like Handaxes in Korea and the Hoabihnian in Northern Vietnam”
Noon
Condon Hall, Room 204

Jeremiah Lecture Series

Thursday, February 14, 2008
“Rethinking Language and Culture: The Nishogakusha International Kanbun Project”
Professor Machi Senjuro, 21st Century COE Program, Nishogakusha University, Japan
McKenzie Hall, Room 375
12:00 pm

This talk will be presented in Japanese with English translation.

JSMA – Buddhist Visions Exhibit Events

Wednesday, February 27, 2008
JSMA Buddhist Visions Exhibit
Lecture: “The Giver of Sons and Mother of Daoist Goddesses
Erin Cline, Assistant Professor of Chinese Philosophy and Religious Studies, University of Oregon
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art
6:00 pm

Jeremiah Lecture SeriesMonday, March 3, 2008
A Confucian Contribution to Justice, Gender, and the Family
Philip J. Ivanhoe, Reader-Professor of Philosophy, Department of Public and Social Administration, City University of Hong Kong
Gerlinger Lounge
5:00 pm
Response by Rebecca L. Walker, Assistant Professor of Social Medicine and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Philosophy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

This talk will be held in conjunction with conjunction with the conference, Confucian Virtues at Work, held at the UOMarch 2-3, 2008.

JSMA – Buddhist Visions Exhibit EventsWednesday, February 27, 2008
JSMA Buddhist Visions Exhibit
Lecture: “The Giver of Sons and Mother of Daoist Goddesses
Erin Cline, Assistant Professor of Chinese Philosophy and Religious Studies, University of Oregon
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art
6:00 pm
Wednesday, March 5, 2008
JSMA Buddhist Visions Exhibit
Concert: Chamber Music on Campus
Enjoy an evening of Asian-inspired music performed by students in the University of Oregon School of Music and Dance.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art
6:00 pm

Wednesday, March 12, 2008
JSMA Buddhist Visions Exhibit
Lecture: Marketplace Morality in 19th and 20th Century Chinese Hell Scrolls
K.E. Brashier, Associate Professor of Religion (Chinese) and Humanities (Chinese), Reed College
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art
6:00 pm

Wednesday, April 2, 2008
JSMA Buddhist Visions Exhibit
Lecture: The Letter of the Law and the Splendor of the Pure Land: The Artistry of Images and Character Calligraphy
Mark Unno, Associate Professor of Religious Studies, University of Oregon

FALL TERM EVENTS

Friday, October 5, 2007
CAPS/Asian Studies Annual Reception
3:00 – 5:00 pm
Knight Library Browsing Room

 

Thursday, October 11, 2007
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Confessions of an Ex-Con: Reading Repentance in Meiji-era Japan”
Christine Marran, Associate Professor of Japanese Literature and Cultural Studies, University of Minnesota
4:00 pm
Knight Library Browsing Room

Thursday, October 18 – Saturday, October 20, 2007
Taiwan Film Festival
Please click here for a listing of films, times and venues

 

Monday, October 22, 2007
“The Other Origin of Species: Ethnic Categorization and Ethnic Identity in Contemporary China”
Thomas Mullaney, Stanford University Department of History
4:00 pm
McKenzie 375
This event is sponsored by History, Ethnic Studies and CAPS.
Friday, November 9, 2007
Korea Speaker Series – brown bag talk
“The American Electronic Voting System: Problems and Solutions”
Yonghi Kim, Director General of the E-Voting Promotion Bureau of the National Election Commission (NEC) of Korea
12:00 pm – CAPS Seminar Room (103 Gerlinger)
Friday, November 16, 2007
Korea Speaker Series – brown bag talk
“A Comparative Study of the National Trust for Historic Preservation in the US & Korea”
Hongdong Kim, Cultural Heritage Administration in the Republic of Korea
12:00 pm – CAPS Seminar Room (103 Gerlinger)
Wednesday, November 28, 2007
“The Political Turmoil in Pakistan: Return from a Ringside Seat”
Anita Weiss, Professor of International Studies, University of Oregon
Mills International Center – EMU
4:00 pm 
This talk is cosponsored by the Concerned Faculty Group. 

 

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2008-09
2007-08
2006-07
2005-06
2004-05
2003-04

October 29, 2010

MGG

Modern Girls on the Go:
Gender, Mobility, and Labor in Japan

January 7-9, 2010
University of Oregon

These events are free and open to the public.
For more info, please call 346-1521.

This international conference, involving scholars from the fields of history, anthropology, visual studies, and literature, will investigate the lived experiences and cultural depictions of women who worked in jobs related to ideas of mobility in twentieth and twenty-first century Japan, including flight attendants, tour bus guides, beauty queens, professional athletes, educators, and soldiers. These women, often conspicuous in their uniforms, have influenced gender norms, patterns of daily life, and Japan’s international image. They have been an integral and highly visual part of the national workforce but have been overlooked by scholars. They performed jobs that were considered fashionable in their first inception and therefore represented ideas of modernity at different historical moments. These laborers show the important relationship between gender, modernity, and technology.

**PLEASE NOTE THE RECENT SCHEDULES CHANGES TO CHRIS HOOD AND JAN BARDSLEY’S PRESENTATIONS.

Thursday, January 7, 2010
2:30 pm – Knight Library Browsing Room
Keynote Presentation: “Kitty on the Go: Japanese Cute as Transborder Fetish”
Christine Yano, University of Hawaii

7:00 pm -Lillis Hall, Room 282
Public Screening: “Even So, I Just Didn’t Do It” (Sore demo, boku wa yattenai, Suo Masayuki, dir., 2006).

Friday, January 8, 2010
9:30 am – 5:00 pm
Lecture Hall, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

9:30-9:45 am – Opening Remarks

9:45 am – 11:00 am
Panel 1: Department Stores as Sites of Mobility

“Moving Up and Out: The ‘Shop Girl’ in Interwar Japan”
Elise K. Tipton, University of Sydney

“Elevator Girls Moving In and Out of the Box”
Laura Miller, Loyola University Chicago

11:00 am – 11:15 am – Coffee break

11:15 am – 12:30 pm
Panel 2: Beauty Work and Japan’s Global Appearance

“Shiseidô and the Mobile Modern Girl”
Vera Mackie, University of Melbourne (presented in absentia)

“Fast Women: The Shinkansen and Changing Japanese Gender Roles”
Christopher Hood, University of Cardiff (presented in absentia) – new time

12:30 pm – 2:30 pm – Lunch break

2:30 pm – 4:00 pm
Panel 3: Models and Modes of Transportation

“’Flying Geisha’: Japanese Stewardesses as Postwar Modern Girls”
Christine Yano, University of Hawaii

“Bus Guides Tour National Landscapes, Pop Culture, and Youth Fantasies”
Alisa Freedman, University of Oregon

4:00 pm – 4:15 pm – Coffee break

4:15 pm – 5:00 pm – Day’s Closing Remarks and Discussion
Jeff Hanes, University of Oregon

Saturday, January 9, 2010
10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Alumni Lounge, Gerlinger Hall

10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Panel 4: Overturning Gender and Class

“Girl Power: Female Soldiers in the Self-Defense Forces”
Sabine Frühstück, University of California, Santa Barbara

“The Ladies League and Corporate Futures: Envisioning an ‘Epoch Change’ Through Female Soccer Success”
Elise Edwards, Butler University

“Beauty Queens on the Go: Miss Japan and the Somatic Uniform”
Jan Bardsley, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill – – new day and time

12:00 pm – 1:30 pm – Lunch break

1:30 pm – 3:00 pm
Panel 5: Japanese Educators and Students in the United States

“Traveling to Learn: Tsuda University Students in the United States, 1900-1941”
Sally A. Hastings, Purdue University

“A Personal Journey Across the Pacific”
Yoko McClain, University of Oregon

3:00 pm – 3:15 pm – Coffee break

3:15 pm – 4:00 pm – Day’s Closing Remarks and Discussion
Carol Stabile, University of Oregon

Please click here to view the paper abstracts.

These events are co-sponsored by the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies, Oregon Humanities Center, the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, the Asian Studies Program, the Department of History, the Center for the Study of Women and Society, and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art. It was made possible by generous contributions from the Yoko McClain Fund, the CAS Deans Discretionary Fund, the Jeremiah Speaker Fund and a grant from the Association for Asian Studies Northeast Asia Council. It is free and open to the public.

Info on Keynote Event

Hello Kitty, that ubiquitous mouthless icon of Japanese Cute, provides a good case study of the methodological and interpretive issues of globalization. The semantic slate of Hello Kitty is both blank and filled with national-cultural meaning. It is this particular kind of straddling of non-meaning and meaning that allows her interpretation as what I call a “transborder fetish.” Here, I borrow the notion of border fetishism from the field of religious studies to reference the hyper-spectacle both within and of the border. However, I push the notion of border fetish further to examine ways in which this product transcends category specificity through the multiple meanings bestowed by consumers globally. With the intensity of the global gaze pushed to new arenas of high-ticket consumption, Hello Kitty becomes the site of ubiquity that crosses borders: cheap and luxurious, innocent and sexy, child and adult, Japan and mukokuseki (no nationality). It is this very transborder quality of the product that makes Hello Kitty not only a marketer’s dream, but also an anthropologist’s challenge.

Okanoue Toshiko’s Collages, Gilkey Center, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

In conjunction with the conference “Modern Girls on the Go: Gender, Mobility and Labor in Japan,” the JSMA is exhibiting a couple of Toshiko Okanoue’s original collages and a selection of photo-lithographs from The Miracle of Silence, a 2007 Nazraeli Press publication. Toshiko Okanoue’s youth was seized by war and a consequence of destruction was reconstruction during the 1950s that included cultural centers and institutions and new museums and galleries. Innovative musicians, writers, and visual artists paved the way for a new era of avant-garde artists. After graduating from the Ogawa Fashion Institute in 1949, Okanoue began studying fashion illustration at Bunka Gakuin College. Lacking confidence in her drawing skills, she started cutting and pasting images from American magazines, such as Vogue and Life. In 1953 these early collages were exhibited at Takemiya Gallery, Tokyo. Art critic Shuzo Takiguchi’s gallery introduction to her work notes, “Miss Okanoue is not a painter; she is a young lady. Working by herself she cuts up illustrated magazines to make collages that depict her very dreams. The resulting album is a contemporary version of Alice in Wonderland.” Please come and see for yourself.

MGG Paper Abstracts

Paper Abstracts

Jan Bardsley, “Beauty Queens on the Go: Miss Japan and the Somatic Uniform”
For many in 1950s Japan, the sight of young women confidently striding the runways of American-style beauty contests signaled the arrival of democratic, postwar modernity. When Itô Kinuko placed third in the Miss Universe pageant in 1953 and Kojima Akiko captured the title in 1959, headlines hailed their victories as evidence of Japanese women’s liberation. Miss Japan’s iconic beauty queen uniform—swimsuit, heels, sash, and tiara—symbolized a “modern girl on the go” in more ways than one. The international beauty contest offered a unique way, albeit a highly competitive one, for pretty young women, even those without much education or family status, to enjoy instant fame in Japan and to fly to California to compete in the Miss Universe contest. Once back home, Miss Japan could become a well-paid model with a chance for a glamorous career in entertainment.

This presentation focuses on Miss Japan’s swimsuit-clad, shapely body as, in effect, the somatic uniform that guaranteed her transnational mobility. Discussing how critics and fans alike interpreted Miss Japan’s physique as a literal embodiment of democracy and American intervention, I take up the attendant popularity of technologies for improving the body—diet regimes, exercise programs, and cosmetic surgery. I show how such attention to the idea of making a female Japanese body competitive in the international beauty pageant ultimately led to discussions of race and gender, inciting criticism that such contests were remaking Japanese women into Anglo-like models who were “too good” for Japanese men.

Elise Edwards, “The Ladies League and Corporate Futures: Envisioning an ‘Epoch Change’ Through Female Soccer Success”
Women’s soccer fits [our company’s] bright, tough, and healthy image perfectly. Men’s soccer still has a long way to go, but women’s soccer has a real future.” With these words to reporters, the CEO of one of Japan’s largest securities firms endorsed his company’s new team in Japan’s burgeoning “Ladies’ League” (L-League) and echoed several other corporate heads who chose to support new women’s teams in the League in the early 1990s. At that time, at the tail end of Japan’s heady “bubble economy,” the country experienced a “soccer boom,” with the number of women and men’s teams from the amateur to the professional ranks growing at unprecedented rates. Soccer was on the rise at the same time that a serious economic decline and what was seen as related societal decay gripped the public consciousness. This rather odd and seemingly unimportant coincidence resulted in soccer quickly becoming a central site for public debates about Japan’s postwar economic and social successes, and reasons for its current decline. Soccer and its star players became centerpieces in discussions of changing business practices, corporate responsibility, and company-worker relations in a time of considerable economic uncertainty. For many, however, it was women’s soccer in particular that signified change—what many characterized as an “epoch change”—and a necessarily new orientation to the world. L-League teams were deployed by corporations in public relations campaigns and internal company promotions as signifiers of change in the forms of new technologies, progressive management policies, and a forward-looking, “twenty-first century” perspective. An examination of corporate investments in women’s soccer —financial and otherwise— and Japanese women’s experiences on corporate teams sheds light on linkages constructed between female athleticism, technology, creativity, innovation, transnational mobility, and rising neoliberalism in Japan in the waning years of the twentieth century.

Alisa Freedman, “Bus Guides Tour National Landscapes, Pop Culture, and Youth Fantasies”
In Japan, it is taken for granted that every tour or charter bus is staffed with a uniformed female worker, who assists the male driver, explains sites en route, and leads tours from designated stops. Given the Japanese-English title “bus guide” (basu gaido), the job derived from the more arduous occupation of bus conductor, known by the diminutive “bus girl” (basu gâru) by the postwar period. The jobs of bus girl and bus guide influenced each other in practice and intersected in literature and popular culture.

Being a bus guide was most desirable during the High-Growth Era of the mid-1950s through the early 1970s, a time when bus girls reached their greatest numbers and taking vacations became a middle-class luxury. As vehicles associated with travel represented Japan’s advance in the jet age, the women who worked on them symbolized national development and pride. Bus guides appeared as model service workers in narratives advancing the idea that hard work will always be rewarded, a notion propelling postwar Japanese society. Yet they were endued with a potentially dangerous sensuality that could be tamed by becoming good wives and wise mothers, roles for women reinforced at the time. Like the more prestigious flight attendants and more ubiquitous bus conductors, bus guides were conceptualized as both ideal employees and erotic icons, thus exposing contradictions inherent in women’s roles in the workforce.

I survey an array of sources, including films adopted from middlebrow fiction serialized in newspapers, popular songs, memorabilia, and toys, to present a composite portrait of bus guides, disclose disparities between their images and lived realities, and show how the job has impacted upon views of Japanese women. As a case study, I analyze a pair of films by director Naruse Mikio made when bus guides were seen as especially “modern” and modes of looking at the homeland were mobilized to promote nationalism – the 1941 Hideko the Bus Conductress (Hideko no shashô-san) based on a novella by Ibuse Masuji and 1952 Lightning (Inazuma) adapted from a Hayashi Fumiko novel. These films foreshadow later depictions of workingwomen. Representations of transport workers demonstrate how women’s mobility shaped notions of service labor and of home and comment on different values associated with Tokyo and the rest of the nation.

Sabine Frühstück, “Girl Power: Female Soldiers in the Self-Defense Forces”
Prominent historian Kano Mikiyo recently warned women against joining the Self-Defense Forces, remarking that the military would militarize women before they could possibly feminize the military. In a 2002 project, feminist artist Shimada Yoshiko, by contrast, urged young women to join the military in order to change the masculine culture of the Self-Defense Forces from within. Popular weekly and monthly magazines suggest that under their uniforms female service members are just like other young women – hip, pretty, and marriageable. At the same time, the personnel and public relations apparatuses of the Self-Defense Forces employ representations of female service members to bridge the anxieties about the gendered order of all things military and to connect the military with wider society and mass culture.

This chapter examines the ways by which female service members deal with these contradictions and how they position themselves vis-à-vis the military establishment and civilian society. Marginal as service members within the ranks but important to the formation of the Self-Defense Forces’ public image, I argue that many of these women emerge as “feminist militarists.”

Sally A. Hastings, “Traveling to Learn: Tsuda University Students in the United States, 1900-1941”
This chapter analyzes the transnational mobility of female students and educators in early twentieth century Japan. I first examine Tokyo women’s schools as sites of cross-cultural communication and then investigate experiences of Japanese exchange students at American universities whose education was financed by scholarships established by Tsuda Umeko, who had attended Bryn Mawr College in the nineteenth century. Although largely excluded from the network of publicly-funded universities, women were able to attend private institutions in Japan, some of them mission-sponsored. Women came from the United States and Canada to be teachers. In particular, the school that Tsuda founded in Tokyo in 1901 served not only as an institution for educating Japanese women in English but also as a space in which students encountered American women and could observe their ways of life. The school was also a point from which Japanese women could embark on studies in distant destinations. Thanks to a strong network of international friendships, a select number of graduates traveled to the United States to study at women’s colleges, including Wellesley and Bryn Mawr. Many of these women became educators and writers, and continued to promote international exchange. The facility in English that Tsuda students acquired allowed them to serve as interpreters and translators and to produce what Mary Louise Pratt has termed “autoethnographies,” constructions of subordinate Japan for consumption in the cultural metropole.

I analyze memoirs of such Tsuda graduates as Sumie Seo Mishima, Hoshino Ai, and Kamiya Mieko in order to explore how their education in Japan prepared them for study abroad and enabled their admission to American institutions. The ways their American education was financed affected their understanding of both international relations and personal relationships. Several of these students stated that they decided to study in the United States in order to return to Japan more self-reliant and independent of their families. While at American universities, these women had to adjust to new kinds of dress, behavior, and diet. For example, they were asked to look “Japanese” at university ceremonies and faced challenges in physical education classes. These women can be viewed as prototypes for later workingwomen and have had a lasting effect on the ways women participated and were viewed as part of Japan’s international relations.

Christopher Hood, “Fast Women: The Shinkansen and Changing Japanese Gender Roles”
The shinkansen (‘bullet train’) has become one of the most potent symbols of Japan’s modernization. The image of it passing in front of Mount Fuji can be found in most travel books and websites relating to the country. For most Japanese, the shinkansen has become a part of normal everyday life, after its triumphant opening in 1964, whether they use it themselves or not. This slide into normality means that it has become a wonderful tool by which to study different aspects of Japanese society. This paper will specifically look at the position of women in Japanese society and what can be learnt by through studying their varying roles on the shinkansen over past four decades.

The paper will begin by providing a brief history of the shinkansen. It will then move on to discuss some of the issues relating to studying symbolism. The main focus of the paper will be on the interaction between women and the shinkansen. This will include discussion of issues as varied as the changing nature of the work done by women on the shinkansen. In particular it considers the work of the pursers, as discussed in a book and popular TV drama Shinkansen Girl, and the impact of having female shinkansen drivers employed in recent years.

Vera Mackie, “Shiseidô and the Mobile Modern Girl”
The modern girl (modan gâru or moga) is a ubiquitous figure in the visual culture of 1920s and 1930s Japan, appearing in cartoons, photography, painting, woodblock prints, graphic design and cinema. She was identified with new urban spaces, including pavements, buses, and cafés, and with the importation of American consumer culture. She was envisioned wearing make-up and daring Western fashions, while smoking cigarettes and eating such new luxury foods as caramels and chocolates. The appearance of the modern girl in popular discourse was made possible by developments in print technologies and photography for mass producing and circulating images. Visuality was an essential component in the construction of the modern girl as an archetypal figure of Interwar urban modernity. It was also a key factor in linking her to Japanese colonialism in other parts of Asia.

In 1935, Shiseidô cosmetics, a company that represented the allure of the Tokyo modern, produced a series of advertisement postcards showing women dressed in the styles characteristic of modern girls, applying make-up and posed in situations of travel. They stand near automobiles, trains, airplanes, or cruise ships. These postcards reference the mobility of the modern girl. Importantly, the Shiseidô postcards address women as subjects of the metropolis who might enjoy the experience of traveling to Japan’s peripheries. Shiseidô thus positioned the Japanese modern girl against colonial subjects. I argue that Shiseidô mobilized the modern girl, the representations of whom had produced a taxonomy of women according to gender, class, ethnicity and racialized positioning, to create a taxonomy of consumers. Representations of the Japanese modern girl in motion provide another way to understand the mobility of capital, products, individuals, and urban images under the conditions of colonial modernity in early twentieth century East Asia.

Yoko McClain, “A Personal Journey Across the Pacific”
True feudalism was long gone while I was growing up in Japan in the 1920s and 30s, but society was still far from democratic. Our family always had three or four maids, and I thought that a mother did not do any housework.

When the War came, however, those maids went off one by one to work in the factories, leaving my mother to learn housework in her early 40s. Feeling sorry for her, I learned how to do domestic chores right alongside her. Far from resenting this, I consider myself lucky to have avoided becoming a domestically inept woman like my mother and her middle-class contemporaries.

The War would change the course of my life in a more profound way, where again opportunity came out of hardship. English was my favorite subject in high school, so I entered Tsuda College in April 1942, a few months after Pearl Harbor. (At the time, many narrow-minded Japanese thought it was of no use to study the enemy’s language.)

In the ensuing two years, the state of affairs in Japan then deteriorated so much that instead of studying, we were put to work in a makeshift factory in the Tsuda gym, running into shelters whenever we heard the ominous sirens of air raids.

When the war ended in August 1945, the school charitably gave us graduation certificates even though we had studied only two years instead of four. And because relatively few Japanese spoke English, we could easily find jobs with only limited English skills, and I began working in an office of the United States military.

A friend of mine then suggested that we take the test for a GARIOA (Government Aid and Relief in Occupied Areas) scholarship, the predecessor of the Fulbright. I expected to fail, but when I somehow passed I was granted a one-year scholarship to the University of Oregon.

Now, after one serendipitous turn after another, I have been here for 57 years, first as a student and then as a teacher. While I still have my roots in semi-feudal Tokyo, I am now proud to consider myself a bona fide American, fully enjoying the remaining years of my life as a writer and lecturer, as well as a traveler whenever chances arise.

Laura Miller, “Elevator Girls Moving In and Out of the Box”
When the Ueno branch of the Matsuzakaya department store re-opened in 1929, it had many new features: heating and air conditioning, a hair salon, its own post office, and eight elevators operated by women. These young female employees were referred to with various titles, including shôkôki gâru (up-down controller girl), hakojô (box girl), and erebêtâ no onna untenshu (woman elevator driver). The name that stuck, however, was erebêtâ gâru (elevator girl) and its abbreviation, erega. The first elevator girls claimed that the hardest part of their job was pulling the handles to make the elevator stop.

The repetitive, standardized work done by uniform-wearing elevator girls occurs in a circumscribed space. Her physical mobility is of a special type: up and down through the elevator shaft for hours and hours throughout the day. It is partly the regularity and constraint of her job, however, that makes her such an appealing object of the popular imagination. Her professional role provokes questions about what she is really like behind the scripted veneer, an almost mannequin-like façade viewed as repressive in the Elevator Girl series by photographer Yanagi Miwa.

This chapter will survey the way popular culture plays with the contrast between the elevator girl’s unvarying work world and her private life or “true self.” News reports in the 1930s latched onto the suicide of an elevator girl involved with a married man as an especially notable scandal. In the 1992 television drama series Tokyo Elevator Girls, the cute and perky workers have tawdry, complex lives behind the scenes. An episode from the anime series Crayon Shin-chan features a crisp and professional elevator girl who turns into a blubbering crybaby once trapped in a broken elevator. The demure elevator girl who is really a wild sex maniac once out of her uniform is a favorite theme in adult videos. The persona of the elevator girl allows us to track the way women in this occupation have been seen not only as an exemplary type of female service worker, but also as a fertile example of the disparity between the crafted public image of a trained employee and her private life. When young women from diverse regional and class backgrounds move into the elevator girl slot, they are trained in uniform ways of speaking and performing the role, highlighting awareness of the gap between their “authentic” selves and the new occupational expectations.

Elise K. Tipton, “Moving Up and Out: The ‘Shop Girl’ in Interwar Japan”
The increasing number of middle-class women in the paid workforce, known as “professional working women,” was a striking new social phenomenon in Japan during the decades after the First World War. Among the many new occupations available for educated middle-class women, the department store sales clerk or “shop girl” (shoppu gâru) proved to be most attractive to girls’ higher school graduates. This chapter will begin by examining the reasons for the popularity of department store employment, which will suggest the social significance of young middle-class women moving from country to city (especially “up” to the capital Tokyo) and out of the home into the workplace. Expectations about department store work also involved social and personal mobility as the women prepared to move to the next stage in their lives – marriage. The chapter will go on to explore how many of these employees found the reality of department store work to be much less glamorous than they had envisioned it would be.

Included in this chapter will be commentaries by Japanese journalists, intellectuals, and government officials about the department store shop girl and the historical changes that this figure represented. Commentators expressed fascination with the beauty and other allures of the shop girl, while voicing concerns about the deleterious effects of the work on women’s moral and physical health. Such contradictions reveal complex considerations of class as well as gender toward social changes of the Interwar decades.

Christine Yano, “‘Flying Geisha’: Japanese Stewardesses as Postwar Modern Girls”
In 1964, the Japanese government officially lifted international travel restrictions imposed since the American Occupation, thereby opening the floodgates of international travel for Japanese citizens. By May 1967, Life magazine proclaimed, “Newest Stewardess Fad: A Japanese in Every Jet,” featuring Japanese stewardesses on eleven international carriers. This paper examines the “Japanese-in-every-jet” phenomenon through the experiences of Japanese stewardesses who flew for the premier carrier – Pan American World Airways. Flying for Pan Am meant adopting the prestigious glamour of the American airline. But it also meant working in a service industry and traveling far from home. These were unwelcome aspects for many of the upper-middle-class families from which the women came. Furthermore, Pan Am’s executive, Najeeb Halaby (CEO from 1969-1972), commented that the ideal for stewardesses lay in the figure of the geisha (or his interpretation of it), placing the model of service directly on Japanese women’s shoulders.

In this chapter, I juxtapose Halaby’s “flying geisha” model to the experiences of Pan Am’s Japanese stewardesses, focusing on issues of gender, nation, race, and class. I contend that the stewardess job – based in mobility, modernity, and cutting-edge technology – often relied on the women’s performance of old-fashioned femininity, particularly racialized within the Japanese context. In the end, the job took elite Japanese women out of the national home and into the corporate sphere of Pan Am’s global cabin and foreign ports of call.

Christine Yano, “Kitty on the Go: Japanese Cute as Transborder Fetish”
Hello Kitty, that ubiquitous mouthless icon of Japanese Cute, provides a good case study of the methodological and interpretive issues of globalization. The semantic slate of Hello Kitty is both blank and filled with national-cultural meaning. It is this particular kind of straddling of non-meaning and meaning that allows her interpretation as what I call a “transborder fetish.” Here, I borrow the notion of border fetishism from the field of religious studies to reference the hyper-spectacle both within and of the border. However, I push the notion of border fetish further to examine ways in which this product transcends category specificity through the multiple meanings bestowed by consumers globally. With the intensity of the global gaze pushed to new arenas of high-ticket consumption, Hello Kitty becomes the site of ubiquity that crosses borders: cheap and luxurious, innocent and sexy, child and adult, Japan and mukokuseki (no nationality). It is this very transborder quality of the product that makes Hello Kitty not only a marketer’s dream, but also an anthropologist’s challenge.

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