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October 29, 2010

Social Complexity Workshop

Workshop

Social Complexity
in the Centers and Frontiers in Northern China

Recent discoveries from ruins along the Yellow River have reshaped our understanding of the Early Chinese civilizations, commonly known as the Xia, Shang, and Zhou Dynasties over 2000 years before the Common Era. Three visiting scholars from China have been actively involved with field projects from the birthplace of the Han people to the Eurasian Steppes of western China. This workshop will discuss issues still relevant to modern China, including the development of social complexity and inequality, political economy, and ethnic identities in frontiers through a prism of dusty relics.

Friday, February 20, 2009
Education Room, Museum of Natural and Cultural History

9:00 – 9:20 am
Workshop Introduction
Gyoung-Ah Lee (Anthropology, University of Oregon)

9:30 – 10:10 am
“Changes of settlement patterns and development of social complexity in the eastern Yuncheng Basin, north-central China”
Dr. Xingming DAI (National Museum of China)

10:20 – 11:00 am
“Understanding the pre-dynastic capital, Zhouyuan: new archaeological
discoveries and research”
Dr. Zhouyong SUN (Shaanxi Provincial Institute of Archaeology)

11:10 – 11: 50 am
“The Development of the early pasturage-nomadic societies and its historical
significance in the Eastern regions of Eurasian Steppes and the beyond”
Dr. Wu GUO (Institute of Archaeology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences)

1:00 – 1:40 pm
“Political economy of agriculture in the Central Plains at the dawn
of civilizations”
Rory Walsh and Gyoung-Ah Lee (Anthropology, University of Oregon)

1:50 – 3:00 pm
Commentary and Panel Discussion
Dr. Melvin AIKENS (Anthropology, Museum of Natural and Cultural History, University of Oregon) and Dr. Ina ASIM (History, Asian Studies Program, University of Oregon)

3:10 – 3:50 pm
Guided Museum tour of the permanent exhibition and a special exhibition, “Earth” at the Musuem of Natural and Cultural History

This event is free and open to the public and is cosponsored by the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies, the Museum of Natural and Cultural History, the Department of Anthropology, the Asian Studies Program, and the Office of International Affairs. For more info, please visit http://caps.uoregon.edu or call 346-1521.

Presentation Abstracts:

Changes of Settlement Patterns and Development of Social Complexity in the Eastern
Yuncheng Basin, North-central China

Xiangming Dai

The Yuncheng Basin, which is located at north-central China, just at the northern bank of the Yellow River, occupies an important position in exploring the origins of early states and civilizations of ancient China. We carried out the full-coverage surveys from 2003 to 2006 in the eastern Yuncheng Basin, and reconstructed the process of the changes of settlement patterns from the Neolithic to the early Bronze Age (ca. 5000-1300 B.C.). This process can clearly reflect the changes of social organizations and the development of social complexity through time. There were several settlement clusters for each of seven cultural periods. During the Early Yangshao period (ca.5000-4100), some relatively simple and independent local groups existed in the villages of these clusters, and there was no settlement hierarchy for this time. The supra-local communities firstly formed in the settlement clusters during the Middle Yangshao period (ca. 4100-3500 B.C.). At this time some large central places had appeared in the clusters, and there were two or three levels of settlement hierarchy for each cluster, most of them were well integrated. This situation kept on going until the Late Yangshao (ca. 3500-2900) and Miaodigou II period (ca. 2900-2400) with some fluctuations of settlement patterns. During the Longshan period (ca. 2400-1900 B.C.), it is the first time that a super-large settlement (Zhoujiazhuang, measuring nearly 500 ha.) appeared at the north of the Basin, which might have integrated all settlement clusters into a single regional polity. From the Erlitou to Erligang period (ca. 1900-1300 B.C.), however, the number of settlements and the scale of central places in the Basin tended to decline, and the social organizations in this region may have been incorporated into the two successive early states—-Xia and Shang dynasties which sprang up in the Central Plains. In general, the eastern Yuncheng Basin may have witnessed a long-term social evolutionary process, from simple and egalitarian societies to hierarchical complex societies. It should have represented a typical trajectory of social development in central China. From 2007 to 2008, we conducted the excavations at Zhoujiazhuang, the largest Longshan site. So far we have found a tremendous fortification (measuring over 200 ha.) with nearly encircled trench at this site. We are concerning with the potential value of this site in investigating the high-level pattern of complex societies.

Exploring the Capital site Zhouyuan in the Western Zhou Dynasty (1046-771BC), China
New Discoveries and Perspectives

Zhouyong Sun

The Zhou people established the third dynasty in Chinese history—the Western Zhou (1046-771BC), following the Xia Dynasty (2070-1600 BC) and the Shang Dynasty (1600-1046BC). As one of the pre-dynastic capital sites of the Zhou, Zhouyuan shows the evolution of the Zhou from a minor state, subordinate to the Shang, to a powerful dynasty. Although various locations for Zhouyuan were proposed in later historical texts, no agreement had been reached until the mid-twentieth century when archaeological surveys were initiated. From the 1950s to 1976, many Western Zhou tombs, bronze hoards and residential remains were excavated. These discoveries eventually resulted in the archaeological identification of Zhouyuan in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Archaeological work on Zhouyuan was suspended in the early 1980s. From 1999 to 2004, the Archaeological Team has excavated the architectural foundations at Yuntang and Qizheng, the eastern Qijia cemetery, Qijia jue-earring workshop, Licun, Hejia, and Zhuangbai bronze foundry. These discoveries during the fifty years make archaeologists believe that the previously identified area is the legendary capital site Zhouyuan of the Zhou people before the Great Conquest of the Shang (1046BC). A recent discovery at the Zhougongmiao site, 30 km west of Zhouyuan, has resulted in reconsideration of the location of capital Zhouyuan (previously identified at the Zhouyuan site). Some scholars have proposed that the real core district of Zhouyuan might be located at Zhougongmiao or in its immediate vicinity, an argument supported by the presence of four-ramp tombs, the bronze foundry, the palatial complex, and the unique utilisation of flooring bricks, especially as a majority of these remains date to the period before the establishment of the Western Zhou Dynasty. However, three years of intensive excavation and investigation have not yet provided sufficient evidence to confidently contradict the previous identification. In this talk, firstly I will present a full-covered review of archaeological discoveries in the Zhouyuan area (including in the Zhouyuan and Zhougongmiao sites) during the past fifty years, and then particularly focused on the discoveries in recent five years. The conclusion will focus on the long-lasting dispute on the nature of the Zhouyuan and the implications of the Zhouyuan urban centre in the process of urbanism in Early China, from an archaeological point view.

Early Pastoral-Nomadic Societies in the Eastern Regions of Eurasian Steppes and the
interactions with the Early China

Guo, Wu

The point of departure of this lecture is the Sanhaizi rubble mound in Qinhe county in Xinjiang (China), the largest Khereksur in the Eurasian steppes. It has given its name to the Sanhaizi culture, of which it may have been the most important ritual center. The Shanhaizi culture inherited some of its cultural traits from the Andronovo period. It grew through multiple and various cultural interactions with the archaeological cultures distributed the eastern Eurasian steppes and with the civilizations of Shang and Zhou dynasties. Its favorable geopolitical conditions – abundant natural resources, the coexistence of multiple ecological systems, the protection from invasion afforded by mountains and deserts, and relative political calm – further facilitated the Sanhaizi culture’s development into a hegemonial power in the eastern Eurasian steppes. To a large degree, the development of the Sanhaizi culture is one of the earliest representative formations of the nomadic Social Complexity in the Eurasian steppes. Its florescence might have triggered the first wave of large-scale East-to-West migrations in the Eurasian steppes about the 8th century BC. Simultaneous with the rise of the Sanhaizi culture, the cultures distributed in the Great Wall Region played very important mediating roles between the Steppe region and the Central Plains of China between the late Shang and the Eastern Zhou periods. It should be pointed that the Chinese early civilizations, especially in the Erlitou period and the early Shang dynasty, rised in a relative peaceful and isolated environment, the fatal expanding powers of those who have mastered the new martial techniques in the middle regions of Eurasian steppes, such as the spoked chariot and the bronze weapons,were weakened by the large land of the Gobi, the desert, the high mountains, and the dry cold wether in the Central Asia. While the new techniques could be spreaded to the central plain of China. When the Sanhaizi culture grew up from the late Shang Dynasty and thrived in the late Western Zhou dynasty, the Chinese civilization had devoloped as strong as being capable of dealing with the threats from the Eurasian steppes by absorbing their advantages, such as the wheat, the sheep,the horse,and the chariot, etc. On the orther hand, the late Western Zhou dynasty had been influenced deeply both in the politics and the culture by the expanding of the Sanhaizi culture through the intermediate pastoral societies around the northwest frontier of the Western Zhou dynasty.

Political Economy of Agriculture in the Central Plains at the Dawn of Civilizations
Rory Walsh and Gyoung-Ah Lee

The China’s Central Plains experienced the dramatic increase of thein social and settlement complexity from the Middle Neolithic to the early state periods over 2000 years (3500 – 1900 BC). Particularly, the Yiluo valley, just south of the Yellow River in Henan province, went through the critical moment of the political and social changes, archaeologically known as the Erlitou phase (ca. 1900 – 1500 BC) and historically as the Xia Dynasty according to some scholars. A key to success in maintaining the states is to controling the mobilization of economic resources. Regional centers like the Huizui site that we are investigating may have channeled material goods from the producers in hinterlands to the consumers in the primary political capitals in the Yiluo valley. Food production has supported the political economy of the state, but the research on the role of agriculture in political economy has been rare, compared to that on the role of prestigious craft production in the region. To fill the gap, we will examine the diachronic changes in agricultural practice at the regional center at Huizui before and after the establishment of the Erlitou state-level society. We hope to contribute to the knowledge of how agriculture changed over the 2000 years leading up to the establishment of the Chinese civilization.

Kanbun Workshop

“The Physician Manase Dosan
(1507-1594):


An International Workshop on Medical Texts and Sino-Japanese Writings in Early Modern Japan

Workshop Schedule


8/25/08

0930-1130
“Patient Records and Manase Gensaku’s Igaku Tenshoki.”
Andrew Goble, University of Oregon

1330-1530
“Aging and Longevity in the Rôjinmon section of Manase Dôsan’s Keitekushû.”
Ed Drott, Dartmouth College

8/26/08
0930-1130
“Health and Sexual Practices as Seen in the Kôso Myôron.”
Machi Senjûrô, Nishô Gakusha University

1330-1530
“The Manase School and the Culture of Publishing in the Early Edo Period.”
Kosoto Hiroshi, Kitasato University

8/27/08
0930-1130
“Portraiture and the Manase School.”
Machi Senjûrô and Kosoto Hiroshi.

1300-1500
“Manase Dôsan in Tale Literature.”
Fukuda Yasunori, Ehime University

1330-1530
“Culture and Arts in Dôsan’s Era: Some Reflections on Tea and Incense.”
Ikeda Yôko, independent scholar.

8/28/08
0930-1130
“Kanbun Resources: Interpretingg Manase Dôsan’s Handwritten Manuscripts.”
Machi Senjûrô, Nishô Gakusha University

1330-1530
“Kanbun Resources: Interpreting Medical Information in Diaries.”
Andrew Goble, University of Oregon

8/29/08
0930-1130
Discussion and Evaluation

All sessions will be held in McKenzie Hall, Room 375.

This event is co-sponsored by the Nisho Gakusha University Center of Excellence (COE) Program and the University of Oregon’s Center for Asian and Pacific Studies. Financial support is provided by Nishogakusha COE, the Yoko McClain Faculty Endowment Fund, the Office of International Programs, the Oregon Humanities Center, the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies, and the Departments of History and Art History. For more info, please call 346-1521.

October 27, 2010

Taiwan Documentaries Conference

The Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures and the Center for Asian and
Pacific Studies Present

Documenting Taiwan on Film:
Methods and Issues in New Documentaries

Workshop and Film Screenings

July 6 – 8, 2009
University of Oregon

These events are free and open to the public. For more info, please call 346-1521.

Day One: Monday, July 6, 2009

Session I:

9:00-10:15
Daw-ming Lee, “History in the Remaking: The Making of Taiwan – A People’s History.” (Graduate Institute of Filmmaking, Taipei National University of the Arts, Taiwan)

10:15-10:30 – Coffee break

10:30-11:45
Sylvia Li-chun Lin, “Recreating the White Terror on Screen” (University of Notre Dame)

Session II:

13:00-14:15
Kuei-fen Chiu, “Media Technologies and the Making of the Human Subject in Contemporary Taiwanese Documentary Films” (Chung-hsing University, Taiwan)

14:15-15:30
Bert Scruggs, “Longing for Authenticity and the Question of Indigenization: Exploring Yan Lanquan and Zhuang Yiceng’s Wu mi le (Let it Be)” (University of California, Irvine)

15:30-15:45 – Coffee break

15:45-17:00
Hsiu-Chuang Deppman, “The Politics of Seeing in Jump, Boys!” (Oberlin College, USA)

19:00-21:30
Film Screenings; Q & A with Director Mayaw Biho (Willamette Hall, Room 110)
“Children in Heaven” (14 min.)
“As Life, As Pacang” (26 min.)
“Carry the Paramount of Jade Mountain on My Back” (46 min.)

Day Two: Tuesday, July 7, 2009

Session III:

9:00-10:15
Christopher Lupke, “Documenting Political Dissent: The Gongliao Fourth Nuclear Reactor as Example” (Washington State University, USA)

10:15-10:30 – Coffee break

10:30-11:45
Li-hsin Kuo, “Sentimentalism and the Bent for Collective ‘Inward-looking’: A Preliminary Analysis of Mainstream Taiwanese Documentary” (National Chengchi University, Taiwan)

Session IV:

13:00-14:15
Tze-lan Deborah Sang, “Imagining Global Modernity through Taiwanese Documentary Films” (EALL, University of Oregon)

14:15-15:30
Guo-Juin Hong, “Voices and Their Discursive Dis/Content in New Taiwan Documentary” (Duke University, USA)

15:30-15:45 – Coffee break

15:45-17:00 – Roundtable Discussion
Commentator: Sharon Sherman (English, University of Oregon)

19:00-21:30 – Film screenings; Q & A with director Mayaw Biho (Willamette Hall, Room 110)
“Dear Rice Wine, You Are Defeated” (26 min.)
“National Bandit: A Beautiful Mistake” (56 min.)
Excerpts from Malakacaway (“The Rice Wine Filler,” 70 min.)

Film Summaries

Children of Heaven (1997/14 min./Betacam)
Underneath the Sanying Bridge lies a shantytown of indigenous people. Every year they are charged with violating the Water Law and forcibly removed from the houses they have built. Nevertheless, after the houses are torn down, the residents return to the same place and build their simple huts again. This process has repeated itself numerous times over the course of many years. For the residents and their children, their routine seems like “playing house.” Yet the question of indigenous people’s right of abode remains unresolved.

As Life, As Pangcah (1998/28 min./Betacam)
A calm, reflective oral history results from this intimate dialogue between a 93-year-old Pangcah tribal chieftain and an indigenous filmmaker. Through word and song, the elder recounts the ways of the Pangcah and his frustrated attempts to defend traditional culture against Taiwan’s encroaching modernity.

Carry the Paramount of Jade Mountain on My Back (2002/46 min./Betacam)
Jade Mountain is Taiwan’s highest peak. For decades, the Tungpu Bunun aborigines have been hired as guides and porters by city-dwelling mountaineers who wish to conquer Jade Mountain. This documentary records their unique contribution to mountain climbing in Taiwan.

Dear Rice Wine, You are Defeated (1998/24 min./Betacam)
In Taiwan, younger members of the Pangcah tribe question the centuries-old tradition of Pacakat – the drinking of powerful rice wine to mark the advancement in rank in their community. While the observance of Pacakat can be dangerous, it also celebrates Pangcah tribal identity.

National Bandits: A Beautiful Mistake (2000/56 min./Betacam)
The elderly Bununs of Tung-Pu have habitually referred to workers at the Vu Mountain National Park as “national bandits” instead of “national park employees.” In the eyes of these old Bununs, the designation of this land as national park has robbed them of most of their ancestral territories, leaving only a very small portion for them to live and farm on. In April 1999, the Ministry of Interior began plans for another National Park called Nun-Dan. This time, the people of multiple tribes refused to be silent.

Malakacaway–The Rice Wine Filler (2009/70min.) The Pangcah people live along the east coast of Taiwan facing the Pacific Ocean. Some Pangcah tribes have been able to keep their traditional culture and ways of living, the most famous example being the Makutaay Tribe. They hold Ilisin (Annual Ceremony) the traditional way every year. The most challenging job belongs to a group of men called “Malakacaway,” who are responsible for fundraising, rice-collecting, accounting, and most importantly and painfully, Patakit (toasting everyone with rice wine over and over again during the five-day ceremony). This is how the Makutaay tribe trains its youngsters to become mature members of the tribe.

October 25, 2010

Garden Workshop

International Workshop

Infinite Worlds
The Cultural Biography of
Chinese Classical Gardens

Friday, April 9 – Saturday, April 10, 2010
Rooms 142-144, UO White Stag Block Buildings
70 NW Couch Street, Portland

Scholars’ gardens are works of art. Their modern derivatives require knowledge of the semantics of the historical literary symbolism as well as the structure of their design. The elements of a Chinese garden – the physical components as well as the ephemeral impressions – are not arbitrary and cannot be separated from cultural politics. This workshop will provide new considerations that will enhance understanding of the experience of ‘reading’ Chinese gardens.

Workshop Program

Friday, April 9

1:00 – 1:15 pm
Opening Remarks and Introduction (Wendy Larson, Vice Provost for UO Portland Programs; Bryna Goodman, Director of the UO Confucius Institute; Cynthia Haruyama, Director of Lan Su Chinese Garden; Ina Asim, UO Department of History)

1:15 – 2:45 pm – History: Gardens as Refuge

“Emperor Huizong’s (r. 1100-1126) Short lived Earthly Paradise”
Dieter Kuhn, Department of History, Princeton University

“Problematizing the ‘Private’ in Ming Gardens”
Ken Hammond, Department of History, New Mexico State University

3:00 – 4:30 pm – The Semantics of an Elitist Universe

“The Large Within the Small: Imperial Garden and Imperialist Metaphor”
Kevin Greenwood, Department of Art History, Willamette University

“From Poetry to Music to Garden: A Diverging Path from Reality to Surreality”
Juwen Zhang, Department of Japanese and Chinese, Willamette University

5:00 – 6:00 pm – Visit to Portland’s Lan Su Chinese Garden (on own)

6:00 – 6:30 pm – Reception, Light Court Commons, UO White Stag Building

6:30 pm – Keynote Address

“Chinese Gardens: New Views and New Directions”
Alison Hardie, School of Modern Languages, University of Leeds

Saturday, April 10

9:30 am – 12:30 pm – The Social Life of Transnational Space

“Cultivating Memory: the Relevance of Liu Fang Yuan, the Garden of Flowing Fragrance at The Huntington”
June Li, Curator of the Garden of the Flowing Fragrance, Liu Fang Yuan at the Huntington Library

“The Making of the Dr. Sun Yat-sen Classical Garden and Expansion Project: The Development and Its Social Impact”
Joe Y. Wai, Architect of the Dr. Sun Yat-sen Garden, Vancouver, BC; Advising architect to the Seattle Chinese Garden

“Chinese Gardens for the 21st Century: Ideals of Traditional Garden Design Overseas and in China”
Ina Asim, Department of History, University of Oregon

“Translating Classical Chinese Gardens for a 21st Century American Audience”
Cynthia Haruyama, Director of Lan Su Chinese Garden

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited.

Pre-registration is required. To register, please click here.

For more info, please call (541) 346-1521.

This event is presented by the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies and cosponsored by the Portland Lan Su Chinese Garden, the UO Confucius Institute, the UO Portland Programs, the Jeremiah Lecture Series Fund, the Oregon Humanities Center, the Center for Intercultural Dialogue, the UO Departments of History, East Asian Language and Literatures, Arts and Administration, and Folklore, as well as support from David Easly.

*Photo by Kay Bork

Participant Bios

INA ASIM
Ina Asim is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Oregon. She specializes in pre-modern Chinese history with an emphasis on archaeology and material culture. While working on a city portrait of the Ming dynasty capital of China, Nanjing, (Coiling Dragon, Crouching Tiger: Urban Life in Late Ming Nanjing; forthcoming) she produced a bilingual educational CD in cooperation with Garron Hale at the Social Science Instructional Laboratory: Colorful Lanterns at Shangyuan (2005) and became infatuated with Chinese Gardens, the result of which is the current workshop, a chapter in her book on Nanjing, and a website she is currently creating in collaboration with Garron Hale.

KEVIN GREENWOOD
Kevin is a specialist in Chinese Buddhist art, and this Fall will defend his doctoral dissertation in Chinese art history at the University of Kansas. His dissertation, entitled /Yonghegong: Art, Politics and Religion in Beijing’s “Lama Temple,” is the first comprehensive overview in English of the architecture and sculpture of the largest Buddhist temple complex in Beijing. Kevin is currently teaching Asian art history at Willamette University in Salem, where a recent course entitled “Chinese Microcosms” focused on the role of traditional cosmology in Chinese religious, imperial and garden architecture.

KEN HAMMOND
Ken Hammond is a Professor of History at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces, where he teaches Global History, East Asian history and the history of China. He is the director of the Confucius Institute at New Mexico State and the editor of the Journal Ming Studies. His research interests are Early Modern and Modern Chinese political culture and history. His many publications include an in-depth biography of the Confucian martyr Yang Jisheng titled Pepper Mountain: The Life, Death and Posthumous Career of Yang Jisheng, 1516-1555. London, Kegan Paul, 2007 and an essay that shows his connectedness with Ming scholars’ ideas about gardens and their conceptualization of the garden culture they shaped, titled “Urban Gardens in Ming Jiangnan: Insights from the Essays of Wang Shizhen.” In Michel Conan and Chen Wangheng, eds., Gardens, City Life and Culture. Harvard University Press, 2008. You can watch or listen to a series of thirty six lectures on Chinese history (in audio or DVD format) from The Teaching Company, titled From Yao to Mao: 5,000 Years of Chinese History. (2004).

ALISON HARDIE
After degrees in Classics at Oxford and Chinese at Edinburgh, Alison Hardie went to China for a year of postgraduate study and then started working with the Hong Kong trading firm Jardine Matheson in their Beijing Office. She continued to work for Jardines and other international companies for a total of 16 years in both China and Hong Kong, mostly on either engineering-related or catering projects. She then returned to the U.K. to take a Master’s at Oxford and a doctorate at Sussex, doing research on the history of Chinese garden design. With this extensive experience in the world of business and academia she began to teach at Newcastle University for six years before moving in 2006 to the University of Leeds, where she is a Senior Lecturer in Chinese Studies. Her translation of Ji Cheng’s (1582 – c. 1642) The Craft of Gardens opened the door to concepts of Ming Garden design for readers around the world. She currently explores the life and thought of the 17th-century playwright, poet and politician Ruan Dacheng and continues her analyses of questions that guided Chinese literati in conceptualizing their personal utopian spaces. Her publications include “Think globally, build locally: syncretism and symbolism in the Garden of Sitting in Reclusion.” Studies in the History of Gardens and Designed Landscapes, vol. 26, no. 4, Oct-Dec 2006; “’Massive structure’ or ‘spacious naturalness’? Aesthetic choices in gardens of the Wang families in Taicang.” Ming Studies 2006; “The Awareness Garden of Wang Shiheng in Yizhen.” Studies in the History of Gardens and Designed Landscapes 2004, 24 (4), 272-279; “Washing the Wutong Tree: Garden Culture as an Expression of Women’s Gentility in the Late Ming”. In: Daria Berg & Chloe Starr, eds., The Quest for Gentility in China: Negotiations beyond gender and class. London: Routledge, 2007; “Conflicting discourse and the discourse of conflict: eremitism and the pastoral in the poetry of Ruan Dacheng (c.1587-1646). In: Daria Berg, ed., Reading China: Fiction, History and the Dynamics of Discourse – Essays in Honour of Professor Glen Dudbridge. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2006.; “Ji Cheng’s Yuan Ye (The Craft of Gardens) in its social setting.” In: The Authentic Garden: a Symposium on Gardens 1990, Leiden: The Clusius Foundation, among others.

CYNTHIA HARUYAMA
Cynthia Haruyama is the Executive Director of Lan Su Chinese Garden in Portland, Oregon. She joined Lan Su in 2008, transitioning from her previous position as the Executive Director of Hoyt Arboretum Friends. Her prior work experience includes leadership for the non-profit Hoyt Arboretum Friends Foundation (Executive Director, 2001 – 2008) and the garden equipment manufacturer A.M. Andrews Co. (General Manager, 1994 – 2000). She has also practiced law, specializing in corporate law and business transactions with the Portland office of Davis Wright Tremaine and Farleigh Wada & Witt. Ms. Haruyama’s educational background includes a law degree from Columbia University and an undergraduate degree in East Asian Studies from Princeton University. She is a native of Portland, Oregon but has also lived in Japan, New Jersey and New York. She has previously served as chair of the Washington Park Alliance, a member of Metro’s Blue Ribbon Trails Committee and on the Master Planning Committee for Leach Botanic Garden. She is an active member of the Cultural Attractions of Portland Area.

DIETER KUHN
Dieter Kuhn is Professor of Chinese Studies at the University of Würzburg in Germany. Currently he is visiting faculty at Princeton University where he is involved with the New Directions in the Study of Early Modern Asia, a PIIRS-Program in East Asian Studies and the East Asian Studies department. His research focuses on the history of material culture, technology, and archaeology in medieval China, especially of the Song period (960-1279). Kuhn’s most recent publications are Perceptions of Antiquity in Chinese Civilization (2008) and The Age of Confucian Rule: The Song Transformation of China (2009), which relates the history of emperor Huizong’s infatuation with the design of his Genyue pleasure park. Dieter Kuhn’s contribution on Chinese textile technology to Joseph Needham’s (ed.) Science and Civilisation in China, Cambridge 1988, is the authoritative source on Chinese textile technology.

JUNE LI
June Li is Curator of the Huntington Library’s Chinese Garden, Liu Fang Yuan, the Garden of Fragrances. Originally from Hong Kong, June Li is a historian of Chinese art and was the a curator of Asian Chinese and Korean art for 18 years at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Since she joined the Huntington Library in 2004, she has undertaken several herculean tasks. She accompanied the first phase of construction of Liu Fang Yuan from the beginning to the opening of the finished site in early 2008. She organizes an ongoing academic lecture series on topics related to Chinese gardens, conferences concerning garden culture, and has published two books: She edited Another World Lies Beyond: Creating Liu Fang Yuan, the Huntington Chinese Garden, which tells the story of constructing Liu Fang Yuan in Southern California and explains the cultural traditions and aesthetics of its design. The catalogue Treasures Through Six Generations: Chinese Painting and Calligraphy from the Weng Collection introduces fiftyone works of calligraphy and painting by such celebrated artists as Shen Zhou, Wen Zhengming, Dong Qichang, Wang Jian, Wang Hui, Wang Yuanqi from the Wan-go H. C. Weng Collection. They were shown in the spring of 2009 in an exquisitely elegant exhibition curated by June Li at the Huntington Library. Currently she is working with the Huntington team on the plan for building the second construction phase of Liu Fang Yuan that will encompass the western area of the garden highlighting a large penjing collection, pavilions and grotto; as well as a northern area of the garden featuring a lake-side performance hall pavilion for music, dance, opera, and readings, a large courtyard, and a climate-controlled secure space hall for art exhibitions, covered corridors, a winding stream with poetry pavilion, as well as a topiary pavilion. June hopes that this will complete the 12 acre site reserved for Liu Fang Yuan, until it grows again in the future.

JOE Y. WAI
Born in Hong Kong, Joe Wai immigrated to Canada at a young age. He was educated in Vancouver, B.C. and looks back at an architectural career spanning 40 years. He has worked with firms such as Arthur Erickson Architects; Thompson, Berwick and Pratt in Vancouver; Denys Lasdun and Partners; and the Greater London Council in London, England. In 1978, he established Joe Wai Architects, which continues to be focused on Community/Cultural projects and Social/Seniors housing. He has served as a member of the Board of Governors and as a sessional instructor in the School of Architecture at the University of British Columbia. Presently, he continues to work with graduates in the Architects-in-Training Programme of the Architectural Institute of British Columbia. Joe Wai served on the AIBC Council from 1985 – 1987. He has served with many community groups and has been appointed to various civic design panels and committees in the past 40 years. Joe Wai was the lead consultant in the design of the Dr. Sun Yat-sen Garden in Vancouver, and currently advises the Seattle Chinese Garden Society and the Foundation of the Tacoma Chinese Reconciliation Project.

JUWEN ZHANG
Juwen Zhang is the Luce Asian Studies Professor of Chinese Language and Culture at Willamette University. His research interests include Chinese ritual studies, folklore performance, ethnic identity, as well as material and popular culture. Currently he works on the Rites of Passage in Chinese Societies and Filmic Folklore. He translated the ancient Chinese text The Book of Burial (Zang Shu) by Guo Pu (276-324), which explains some of the elements of planning and layout that much later contributed to shaping the design of scholarly gardens.

2006-07 Events

SPRING TERM EVENTS

Friday, April 13, 2007
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Dying on Principle: The Claims and Renunciations of Suicide Bombing”
Faisal Devji, Department of History, The New School for Social Research
Lillis Hall, Room 211
4:00 pm

Tuesday, April 17, 2007
Public Lecture
“An Ethics of Reading the Environment in Postcolonial Fiction”
Sangeeta Ray, Department of English, University of Maryland
Lillis Hall, Room 185
4:00 pm

Thursday, May 3, 2007
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Scandalous Sentiments: Improper Desires and Inconvenient Resentments in the Demise of an Elite Chinese Family”
Janet Theiss, Department of History, University of Utah
Lillis Hall, Room 132
4:00 pm

Wednesday, May 30, 2007
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Miike Takashi vs. Tsukamoto Shinya: Main Event in Japan’s Genre Film Arena?”
Tom Mes, Independent Film Scholar/Journalist & Founder of MidnightEye.com
Lillis Hall, Room 182
7:00 pm

Wednesday, June 6, 2007
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“China: Rebalancing Economic Growth”
Nicholas Lardy, Senior Fellow, Peterson Institute for International Economics
Lillis Hall, Room 282
5:00 pm

WINTER TERM EVENTS

Thursday, January 11, 2007
Korean Film Series
Take Care of My Cat (2001 – 112 min)
Director: Jae-eun Jeong
International Resource Center, EMU
7:00 pm

Tuesday, January 16, 2007
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“The Horror of Globalization”
Mitsuhiro Yoshimoto, Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, East Asian Studies, New York University
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:00 pm

Thursday, January 18, 2007
Korean Film Series
Peppermint Candy (1999 – 129 min)
Director: Lee Chang-dong
International Resource Center, EMU
7:00 pm

Thursday, January 25, 2007
Korean Film Series
A State of Mind (2004 – 93 min)
Director: Daniel Gordon
International Resource Center, EMU
7:00 pm

Wednesday, January 31, 2007
Korean Film Series
Chi-hwa-seon (2002 – 116 min)
Director: Kwon-taek Im
6:00 pm
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

Thursday, February 1, 2007
Korean Film Series
Chi-hwa-seon (2002 – 116 min)
Director: Kwon-taek Im
International Resource Center, EMU
7:00 pm
CAPS, JSMA, and IRC

Wednesday, February 7, 2007
Korean Speaker Series
“Art and Politics: Picasso’s Korean War paintings and Abstract Art of Korea and Japan, 1950’s-1960’s”
Young-Mok Chung, Chair, Department of Painting and Art Theory, College of Fine Arts, Seoul National University; Visiting Scholar, Center for Asian and Pacific Studies, University of Oregon
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art – Lecture Hall
4:00 pm

Thursday, February 8, 2007
Korean Film Series
Shiri (1999 – 125 min)
Director: Je-gyu Kang
International Resource Center, EMU
7:00 pm

Friday, February 9, 2007
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“From Area Studies to Cultural Studies: A Commentary on Paradigm Shifts in Research of Cultures”
Liu Kang, Professor of Chinese Cultural Studies, Duke University
Lillis Hall, Room 132
4:00 pm (please note the time for this event has changed from 3 pm to 4 pm)

Thursday, February 15, 2007
Korean Film Series
Oldboy (2004 – 120 min)
Director: Chan-wook Park
International Resource Center, EMU
7:00 pm

Thursday, February 22, 2007
Korean Film Series
The Isle (2000 – 89 min)
Director: Ki-duk Kim
International Resource Center – EMU
7:00 pm

Tuesday, February 27, 2007
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Burma’s Indigenous Peoples: A Human Rights and Environmental Crisis”
Edith Mirante, Director of “Project Maje” and author of Down the Rat Hole: Adventures Underground on Burma’s Frontiers
Many Nations Longhouse
4:00 pm

Thursday, March 1, 2007
Korean Film Series
Joint Security Area (JSA) (2000 – 110 min)
Director: Chan-wook Park
International Resource Center, EMU
7:00 pm

Thursday, March 8, 2007
Korean Film Series
Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter, and Spring (2003 – 103 min)
Director: Ki-duk Kim
International Resource Center, EMU
7:00 pm

Monday, March 12, 2007
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Hegemony Outsourced: The United States, India and the Struggle for Asian Architecture”
Siddharth Varadarajan, Associate Editor, The Hindu
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:00 pm

 

Thursday, March 15, 2007
Korean Film Series
3-Iron (2004 – 88 min)
Director: Ki-duk Kim (II)
International Resource Center, EMU
7:00 pm

FALL TERM EVENTS

Friday, October 6, 2006
CAPS/Asian Studies Welcome Reception
Knight Library Browsing Room
3:00 – 5:00 pm

Monday, October 16, 2006
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Kamishibai: the Construction of Space and the National Imaginary in Modernizing Japan”
Sharalyn Orbaugh, Associate Professor of Asian Studies and Women’s Studies, University of British Columbia
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:00 pm

Tuesday, October 24, 2006 – revised
“Archaeological Surveys and Exploration in the Northwest Frontier Provinces, Pakistan”
Dr. Ihsan Ali, Vice Chancellor, Hazara University, Mansehra, Pakistan
204 Condon Hall
3:30 pm

Thursday, November 16, 2006
“The North Korean Nuclear Test and Northeast Asian Security”
Mel Gurtov, Professor of Political Science and International Studies, Portland State University
McKenzie Hall, Room 221
7:30 PM

A public lecture followed by a discussion with Richard P. Suttmeier, Professor of Political Science, University of Oregon; Heung Ho Moon, Professor of Political Science, Hanyang University; and Jinwoo Choi, Professor of Political Science, Hanyang University

Professor Gurtov, a Senior Fulbright Scholar in South Korea in 1994, is editor-in-chief of Asian Perspective, an international quarterly journal published in Seoul, and author of several books, including Pacific Asia? Prospects for Security and Cooperation in East Asia.

This event is presented by the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies and is free an open to the public. Support has also been provided by Hanyang University and the Admiral David E. Jeremiah and Mrs. Connie Jeremiah Speaker Fund. For more information, please call (541) 346-1521.

Friday, November 17, 2006
“Korean-Chinese Migrant Workers and Re-definition of Koreanness”
Jungmin Seo, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Hawaii at Manoa
McKenzie Hall, Room 375
3:30 pm
This talk is cosponsored by the Department of Political Science.

Tuesday, November 28, 2006
Brown Bag Talk
“New Developments in the Korean Governance for Science and Technology Policy”
Hyun Suk Cho, Department of Public Administration at Seoul National University of Technology
CAPS Seminar Room (103 Gerlinger Hall)
12:00 pm

 

Past Events, Listed by Academic Year

2013-2014
2012-2013
2011-12
2010-11

2009-10
2008-09
2007-08
2006-07
2005-06
2004-05
2003-04

2008-09 Events

July 6 – 8, 2009
Documenting Taiwan on Film: Methods and Issues in New Documentaries
Workshop and Film Screenings
At the University of OregonThese events are free and open to the public. For a complete schedule, please click here.
Thursday, June 4, 2009
Panel Discussion
“Retrospectives on Tiananmen:  Two Decades Later”
Knight Library Browsing Room
7:00 pmPanel Participants:
Bryna Goodman, Department of History
David Li, Department of English
Richard Suttmeier, Department of Political Science
Tuong Vu, Department of Political Science
Friday, May 29, 2009
Brown Bag Talk
“Water Pollution Control Issues in China”
Zhuoni Wang, PhD Candidate, School of Environment and Natural Resources, Renmin University of China; Courtesy Research Assistant, Center for Asian and Pacific Studies, University of Oregon
Gerlinger Hall, Room 103 (CAPS Seminar Room)
12:00 pm
Friday, May 15, 2009
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Male Friendship and Male Homosexuality in Late Imperial China”
Martin Huang, Professor, East Asian Languages & Literature, University of California at Irvine
Lillis Hall, Room 175
3:30 pm
Thursday, May 14, 2009
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Transforming an Urban Informal Settlement in an Asian Mega City: The Work of the Orangi Pilot Project, Karachi.”
Arif Hasan, Architect and Planner; Visiting Professor of Architecture and Planning, University of Karachi in Pakistan
Knight Library Browsing Room
3:30 pm
Friday, April 17, 2009
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“The Japanese Community of Shanghai: The First Generation, 1862-1895”
Joshua Fogel, Canada Research Chair and Professor, History Department, York University
McKenzie Hall, Room 375
3:30 pm
Thursday, April 16, 2009
Department of History Pierson Lecture Series
“The Precious Raft of History: The Past, the West, and the Woman Question in China”
Joan Judge, Associate Professor, Division of Humanities/School of Women’s Studies, York University
McKenzie Hall, Room 229
3:30 pm
Tuesday, March 31, 2009
“Humiliate-able Bodies: Rape in Wartime Propaganda Cartoons of the Sino-Japanese War”
Louise Edwards, Director, China Research Centre, University of Technology Sydney (UTS), Australia
Knight Library Browsing Room
3:30 pm
Thursday, March 5, 2009
“South Asian Models: New Strategies for Book History in the 21st Century”
Abhijit Gupta, Reader in English, Jadavpur University; Fulbright Senior Research Fellow, University of California at Riverside
EMU Maple Room
3:00 pm
Thursday, February 26, 2009
“How to Write a Woman’s Life Into and Out of History: The Case of Wang Zhaoyuan (1763-1851)”
Dr. Harriet Zurndorfer, Sinological Institute, Leiden University, The Netherlands
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:00 pm
Friday, February 20, 2009
Workshop: “Social Complexities in the Centers and Frontiers in Northern China”
Education Room, Museum of Natural and Cultural History
9:00 am – 3:00 pmFor a complete program, please click here.
November 18, 2009
“SURVIVING THE KILLING FIELDS”
Impacts and Aftermath of the Cambodian Genocide
Mills International Center, EMU
5:30 – 7:00 pm
October 23 – 25, 2008
Taiwan Film Festival
For a complete schedule, please click here.
Thursday, October 16,2008
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Border Crossing and the Woman Writer: The Case of Gui Maoyi (1765-1835/6)”
Ellen Widmer, Edith Stix Wasserman Professor of East Asian Studies, Wellesley College
Thursday, October 16,2008
Jeremiah Lecture Series
”What is Buddhist Philosophy?”
M. David Eckel, Distinguished Teaching Professor of the Humanities, Boston University
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:00 pm 

Friday, October 10, 2008

CAPS/Asian Studies Annual Reception
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:00 – 5:30 pm*A meeting with the new Dean of CAS, Scott Coltrane and the Associate Dean for Social Sciences, Larry Singell, will precede the reception. It will be held in the Knight Library Administration Office, Room 115 at 3:00 pm. This is a great opportunity to speak with them about the future of Asian Studies, your wishes, concerns, etc.
August 25-29, 2008
“The Physician Manase Dosan (1507-1594): An International Workshop on Medical Texts and Sino-Japanese Writings in Early Modern Japan”
McKenzie Hall, Room 375This event is co-sponsored by the Nisho Gakusha University Center of Excellence (COE) Program and the University of Oregon’s Center for Asian and Pacific Studies. Financial support is provided by Nishogakusha COE, the Yoko McClain Faculty Endowment Fund, the Office of International Programs, the Oregon Humanities Center, the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies, and the Departments of History and Art History.For a complete program, please click here.

Past Events, Listed by Academic Year

2013-2014
2012-2013
2011-12
2010-11

2009-10
2008-09
2007-08
2006-07
2005-06
2004-05
2003-04


2005-06 Events

2005-06 Events

SUMMER EVENTS

Monday, July 31, 2006

Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Deep Listening, Deep Hearing: Buddhism and Psychotherapy East & West”
Dr. Jan Chozen Bays, M.D., Abbot, Great Vow Zen Monastery
Gerlinger Lounge
7:00 pm

SPRING TERM EVENTS

Thursday, April 6, 2006

Korea Speaker Series – Brown Bag talk
“High-Tech Ventures in Korea”
Moonhyun Nam, Reporter, Seoul Economic Daily; Visiting Scholar, Center for Asian and Pacific Studies
103 Gerlinger Hall
12:00 pm

Friday, April 14, 2006

China Speaker Series – Engaging China: History, Culture, Politics
“Why Ancient China Just Never Goes Away”
Steve Durrant, Professor of Chinese Literature; Acting Associate Dean of Humanities, University of Oregon
Lillis Hall, Room 212
12:00 pm

This talk is cosponsored by the Lundquist College of Business.

Monday, April 17, 2006

Korea Speaker Series
“Our Nation: A Korean Punk Rock Community” Lecture and Documentary Showing
Dr. Stephen Epstein, Director, Asian Studies Institute, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
Lillis Hall, Room 111
4:00 pm

The rise of a new youth subculture in the Republic of Korea is an outgrowth of dramatic changes occurring there in the 1990’s. The country elected its first civilian president, it experienced new prosperity, and became increasingly exposed to Western influences. Young Koreans became exposed to the internet and a steady stream of new musical influences. Our Nation is a stunning portrayal of how Korean youth are using punk rock to find their voices in a rapidly changing culture.

This talk is cosponsored by the Oregon Humanities Center and the Asian Studies Program.

Friday, April 21, 2006

China Speaker Series – Engaging China: History, Culture, Politics
“Let the Best Win. Ritual, Performance, and Competition in Chinese History”
Ina Asim, Associate Professor of History, University of Oregon
Lillis Hall, Room 212
12:00 pm

This talk is cosponsored by the Lundquist College of Business.

Friday, April 28, 2006

Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Lovers, Talkers, Monsters, and Good Women: Contrasting Images from 16th-Century Chinese Epitaphs and Fiction.”
Katherine Carlitz, Assistant Director for Academic Affairs, Asian Studies Center; Adjunct Professor, Department of East Asian Languages & Literatures, University of Pittsburgh
Knight Library Browsing Room
3:30 pm

Monday, May 1, 2006

Jeremiah Lecture Series
“The City and the Citizen: Forms in Bombay and Bengal in the 50s Cinema”
Moinak Biswas, Department of Film Studies, Jadavpur University, Calcutta
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:00 pm

Moinak Biswas writes on Indian cinema and culture and has contributed to various journals and anthologies. He edits the Journal of the Moving Image, an annual publication of Jadavpur University, has edited two volumes of Bengali writings by Hemango Biswas, and the forthcoming (April, 2006) Apu and After: Revisiting Rays Cinema (Calcutta: Seagull Books and Oxford: Berg Publishers).

This event is presented by the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies and cosponsored by the CSWS Empire RIG, the Oregon Humanities Center, Asian Studies, Comparative Literature, English, Ethnic Studies, the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics, and the Center on Race, Ethnicity, and Sexuality Sttdies (CRESS).

Tuesday, May 2, 2006 – EVENT CANCELLED

Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Kamishibai: the Construction of Space and the National Imaginary in Modernizing Japan”
Sharalyn Orbaugh, Associate Professor of Asian Studies and Women’s Studies, University of British Columbia
Lillis Hall, Room 182
4:00 pm

Friday, May 5, 2006

China Speaker Series – Engaging China: History, Culture, Politics
“Transforming the Chinese Economy: The Making of a High Tech Competitor”
Richard P. Suttmeier, Professor of Political Science, University of Oregon
Lillis Hall, Room 212
12:00 pm

This talk is cosponsored by the Lundquist College of Business.

Friday, May 12, 2006

Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Performing (in) Bali: Kembali, Bali, and Hyper-Bali”
Michael Tenzer, Professor of Music, University of British Columbia
Knight Library Browsing Room
3:00 pm

Bali’s vibrant culture has experienced virtually nonstop accelerated change for a hundred years or more, almost always in conjunction with the phenomenon of cross-cultural interaction. This presentation combines film and discussion to problematize the multidimensional strategies, successes, and compromises that Balinese culture–seen here in terms of its music–has devised to cope with such change, which includes both inward-facing ultra-traditionalism and the upheavals of ongoing interface with others. These videos will be used a springboard for discussing cross-cultural interaction in the Balinese context and how it has changed over time.

Thursday, May 18, 2006

Korea Speaker Series – Brown Bag Talk
“Institutional Inertia: The Six Party Talks and the Future of Two Koreas”
Sangbum Shin, Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Oregon
159 PLC (Oregon Humanities Center Conference Room)
12:00 pm

Friday, May 19, 2006

China Speaker Series – Engaging China: History, Culture, Politics
“Networked Intelligence for the China Market”
Robert Felsing, East Asian Bibliographer, Knight Library, University of Oregon
Lillis Hall, Room 212
12:00 pm

This talk is cosponsored by the Lundquist College of Business.

Thursday, May 25, 2006

Jeremiah Public Lecture
“Candor the World Over: Toward Some Unlikely Connections Between Japanese film, Global Ideology, Health Care and Political Resistance”
Eric Cazdyn, Associate Professor of East Asian Studies, Comparative Literature and Cinema Studies, University of Toronto
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:30 pm

This talk explores a new candor emerging in the world today, one that immediately recognizes the objective logic of global capitalism–how the stunning inequalities in the world (especially around access to life-saving medications) are not the result of capitalism’s failures, but of its successes. One unlikely place where this growing candor is expressed is in contemporary Japanese cinema (in particular, in the work of Tsukamoto Shinya, Miike Takashi, and Kurosawa Kiyoshi). Clinical, imminent, non-referential, and non-moralizing: these directors twist their cold obsession with horror and the wounded body out of the bloody facts of contemporary history–while at the same time seeming to care nothing for the world. But when these insular cinematic obsessions are put near our most radical democratic desires (for global equality and justice), something sparks and fuses with some of the more hopeful political movements in the world today.

Friday,June 2, 2006

China Speaker Series – Engaging China: History, Culture, Politics
“U.S.-China Relations: Is a Rising China a Threat to the U.S.?”
Hua-yu Li, Associate Professor of Political Science, Oregon State University
Lillis Hall, Room 212
12:00 pm

This talk is cosponsored by the Lundquist College of Business.

WINTER TERM EVENTS

Monday,January 23, 2006

Jeremiah Public Lecture
“Comparative Study of Religion: Its Relevance to Study of Any One Tradition and to Philosophy of Religion”
Dale Cannon, Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, Western Oregon University
180 PLC
7:30 pm

Tuesday, January 24, 2006

Chinese New Year Celebration and Introduction of the
Chinese Flagship K-16 Academic Director, Madeline Spring
3:30 – 5:30 pm
EMU International Resource Center

Thursday, February 2, 2006

Jeremiah Public Lecture
“Meaning and Mantra: Indic Philosophy of Language in East Asia”
Richard Payne, Dean, Institute of Buddhist Studies, Graduate Theological Union
Gerlinger Lounge
7:30 pm

Monday, February 27, 2006

Phi Beta Kappa Public Lecture
“East and West in the Origins of a Modern World Economy”
Kenneth L. Pomeranz, Chancellor’s Professor of History, University of California, Irvine
180 Prince Lucien Campbell Hall
7:30 pm

Abstract:
Up until the eve of the Industrial Revolution, the more advanced economies in various parts of Eurasia were more similar than we had realized. This, in turn, demands new explanations for the enormous divergence in wealth and power that emerged in the nineteenth century and a new perspective on the old question of “Why was Europe first?”
Friday, March 10, 2006

“China: Its Borderlands and Its Neighbors”
Morris Rossabi, Professor of History, East Asian Institute at Columbia University and
The Graduate Center, City University of New York
Clark Honors College Library – Chapman Hall
3:00 pm

This talk is presented by the Clark Honors College and cosponsored by the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies and the Department of History. For more info, please call 346-3345.

Monday,March 20, 2006

Jeremiah Public Lecture
“Scythe and the City: Exploring Death in 20th Century Shanghai”
Christian Henriot, Fulbright Scholar, Center for Chinese Studies, University of California, Berkeley
375 McKenzie Hall
4:00 pm

FALL TERM EVENTS

Thursday, October 6, 2005

Jeremiah Public Lecture
“Chinese Family Survival Strategies in War and Revolution”
Sherman Cochran, Hu Shih Professor of History, Cornell University
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:00 pm

Friday,October 7, 2005

CAPS/Asian Studies Reception
375 McKenzie Hall
3:00 – 5:00 pm

Thursday, October 13, 2005

Jeremiah Public Lecture
“Pakhtuns and Political Challenges for Pakistan”
Dr. Ghulam Taqi Bangash, Dean, Faculty of Arts & Humanities; Professor, Department of History, University of Peshawar, Pakistan
Rogue River Room (in the EMU, near the food court)
4:00 pm

Pakhtuns have been in the news ever since the Pakhtun-dominated government of the Taliban was ousted by U.S. forces in October 2002. That same month, an Islamist coalition was voted into office in the Pakhtun-dominated Northwest Frontier Province (NWFP) that borders Afghanistan in Pakistan. Today, global politics still embroil local politics in the NWFP as Pakistani military forces hunt for terrorists in Pakhtun tribal areas along the border. Professor Bangash will address what the issues are for Pakhtuns in Afghanistan, the NWFP and nearby tribal areas in Pakistan, and the ensuing political challenges these issues create for the government of Pakistan.

Friday, October 21, 2005

Jeremiah Public Lecture
“The Political Landscape of War Memory in Japan”
Franziska Seraphim, Department of History, Boston College
375 McKenzie Hall
3:00 pm

Past Events, Listed by Academic Year

2013-2014
2012-2013
2011-12
2010-11

2009-10
2008-09
2007-08
2006-07
2005-06
2004-05
2003-04

 

2009-10 Events

 

SPRING TERM EVENTS

Friday, April 9 – Saturday, April 10, 2010
International Workshop
Infinite Worlds: The Cultural Biography of Chinese Classical Gardens
UO White Stag Block Buildings in Portland
For a complete workshop schedule and registration, please click here.
Thursday, April 15, 2010
Jeremiah Lecture “Crisis and Reconciliation in Swat”
Dr. Sultan-i-Rome, Professor of Politics and History, Jahanzeb College, Swat, NWFP, Pakistan
Gerlinger Lounge 4:00 pm
Monday, April 19, 2010
“Where is Shanghai? Visual Art and the City”
Lisa Claypool, Associate Professor of Art History and Humanities, Reed College
Mills International Center (EMU)
3:00 pm
(Cosponsored by the Confucius Institute and EALL)
Thursday, April 22, 2010
Jeremiah Speaker
“Inequality and Its Enemies in Contemporary China”
Mark Selden, Senior Research Associate in the East Asia Program at Cornell University
Mills International Center (EMU)
3:00 pm
Friday, April 30, 2010
Public Lecture
“Why So Blue?: Mandala Transmission and the Transformation of Eighth-Century Representational Modes”
Cynthea Bogel, University of Washington
Pape Room – Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art
5:00 pm
Friday, April 30 – Saturday, May 1, 2010
Symposium
“Nara, City of East Asia: Cosmopolitanism and Localism in 8th-Century Japan”
Pape Room – Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art
9am – 4 pm
For a complete symposium schedule, please click here.

Friday, May 14, 2010
Conference
“International Conference on Nuclear Weapons and the Security of Korea and East Asia”
Knight Library Browsing Room
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
For a complete schedule, please click here.
Friday, May 14, 2010
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Looking Backward to Go Forward: On Future Korea-U.S. Relations”
Dr. Yang Sung-chul, Chairman, the Kim Dae-jung Peace Foundation Advisory Committee and a Distinguished Professor, Korea University; former Korea Ambassador to the United States, 2000-2003
Knight Library Browsing Room
5:30 pm

 

WINTER TERM EVENTS
Thursday, January 7, 2010
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Kitty on the Go: Japanese Cute as Transborder Fetish”
Christine Yano, University of Hawaii
Knight Library Browsing Room
2:30 pm
Friday, January 8 – Saturday January 9, 2010
Conference: Modern Girls on the Go: Gender, Mobility, and Labor in Japan
For a complete Conference schedule, please click here.
Wednesday, January 20, 2010
Jeremiah Lecture
“Politics and Passion in Maorist and Post-Mao China”
Ban Wang, Professor Chinese Literature, Stanford University
Mills International Center EMU
3:00 pm

Thursday, January 28, 2010
“Who owns Taiwan
Peng Ming-min, Chairman, Peng Ming-min Foundation
Knight Library Browsing Room
3:30 pm
The talk by Peng Ming-min can be found here.

Wednesday, February 10, 2010
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Music Competitions in Bali: Enlisting the Invisible World to Become Champions of the Visible”
Wayne Vitale, Trotter Visiting Professor, University of Oregon School of Music and Dance
Knight Library Browsing Room
7:00 pm
Monday, February 22, 2010
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Crime and Punishment in China – A History of Penal Systems in the Twentieth  Century”
Klaus Muehlhahn, Professor of History, Indiana University
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:00 pm
Monday, March 15, 2010
Digital China and Social Media

Livestream of New York panel from The Paley Center for Media plus Portland panel discussion
UO White Stag Block Buildings in Portland
3:30 – 6:00 pmFor more information and registration, please click here.This event is cosponsored by the Northwest China Council and the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies.


FALL TERM EVENTS

Thursday, September 24, 2009
Brown Bag talk
“Shamans, Nostalgias, and the IMF: South Korean Popular Religion in Motion”
Laurel Kendall, American Museum of Natural History
159 PLC (OHC Conference Room)
12:00 pm
Tuesday, October 20, 2009
Jeremiah Lecture Series
Yomi Braester, Department of Comparative Literature and Program in Cinema Studies, University of Washington
“The Instant City and the Postspatial Turn in Chinese Cinema”
Knight Library Browsing Room
3:00 pm
Thursday, October 22, 2009
CAPS/Asian Studies Annual Reception
Mills International Center (above the EMU Post Office)
3:00 – 5:00 pm
Wednesday, November 4, 2009
Poetry Reading
“Tiger Tracks: Poetry and Performance from Southwest China”
By Aku Wuwu, Poet and Professor of Yi Studies and Ethnic Minority Literature at the
Southwest Nationalities University in China
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art – Lecture Hall
4:00 pm
Tuesday, November 10, 2009
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Tilting Toward Quagmire: Afghanistan and Vietnam”
John Prados, Senior Fellow and Project Director, National Security Archive
Knight Library Browsing Room
7:00 pm
Wednesday, November 11, 2009
Jeremiah Lecture Series
“Dangerous Amusements: Labor, Sociability and Counterpublic Culture in Hawaii, 1909-1930”
Denise Khor, Lecturer, Department of History, Harvard University
Knight Library Browsing Room
4:00 pm


Past Events, Listed by Academic Year

2013-2014
2012-2013
2011-12
2010-11

2009-10
2008-09
2007-08
2006-07
2005-06
2004-05
2003-04

October 15, 2010

Application for CAPS Faculty Reading Group

A limited number of grants of $500 will be made to establish CAPS focused reading groups that meet to discuss articles and books on a topic within the CAPS fields. Application must be made by a group of no fewer than three CAPS faculty (one of whom is designated the coordinator of the group.)

The grant is to be used for the reproduction of articles and the purchase of books for group use; it may also be put toward the invitation of speakers. At the end of the academic year, the coordinator of the group is required to submit to CAPS a report on the group’s activities. Applications (including an explanation of the focus of the group and a list of members) are due on November 17, 2017.

To submit a proposal, please click here to complete the online application form. For a hardcopy version of the application form, please contact Holly Lakey at lakey@uoregon.edu.

CAPS Small Professional Grants for Faculty

The Center for Asian and Pacific Studies is offering awards of up to $500 in support of the professional activities of its faculty. Awards will be made for the following purposes: travel to conferences to present papers (once funds from the faculty member’s department have been exhausted), travel to library, museum, and archival collections; and expenses related to book and article production and publication.

To submit a proposal, please click here to complete the online application form.

Applications will be reviewed twice per year. The deadlines for small grant applications are:

Fall: November 16, 2018 (for winter and spring 2019 projects)

Spring: April 5, 2019 (for summer and fall 2019 projects)

Awards must be used within one year of the date of the award. Applicants may apply for a CAPS Small Grant before they’ve been accepted to a conference, though their award will be continent upon acceptance confirmation.

No retroactive awards can be made. Successful applicants are asked, after the award has been used, to write a brief letter to CAPS reporting on the completion of the relevant project.

For a hardcopy version of the application form, please contact Holly Lakey at lakey@uoregon.edu.

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